Category Archives: First Aid Safety

Here Is What It Takes for You to Become A Demolition Expert

Here Is What It Takes for You to Become A Demolition Expert

 Did you ever wonder what does a demolition expert do?

Are you interested in pursuing this career, but have no idea what are the formalities involved with this job?

Firstly, you need to know who a demolition expert is, and only then can you know what they do.

Demolition experts or explosive workers are managers of any construction work and are experts in every sort of demolition work.

Now, what do they specialize in?                                            

They just don’t break things, if that is what you are thinking, a lot is involved here. Some of the important activities, an explosive worker undertakes are:

  • Decision Making and Problem Solving

They analyze and assess a problem and evaluates the results, based on which the most suitable solution is chosen to solve the problem.

  • Acquiring Information

They are required to make observations about their project and organize information based on that.

  • Documentation of Information

They are responsible for storing and recording the acquired information in the magnetic or electronic form.

  • Handling and Transporting Objects

A demolition expert is required to physically install, reposition, and move objects and also manipulate them.

  • Operation of Vehicles and Equipment

They are required to drive and navigate vehicles or mechanized automobiles like forklifts, aircraft, and cranes.

These are just to name a few. Seems like a lot of responsibilities, doesn’t it?

Now the next question is what the educational qualifications you would require for this job?

A traditional college degree is not necessary to become a demolition expert. You can, of course, have additional merit if you graduate with a bachelor’s degree in engineering or construction.

This might not seem much, but a person requires a lot of skills to become a demolition expert. Do you think you have what it takes?

Find it out yourself!

 

The necessary skills required to pursue this career are as follows:

  • Keen Observation and Monitoring Skills

You need to monitor and assess your performance and other performances, in order to make necessary improvements or corrections.

  • Ability to Critical Think and Analyze

You need to have sharp thinking skills and make use of your logic to analyze the weaknesses and strengths of various solutions, inferences and approaches to any problem in order to choose the best possible option for them.

  • Good Judgment and Decision-Making Skills

You need to be able to analyze the relative costs and benefits of any project and choose the most suitable one.

  • Complex Problem-Solving Skills

You should be able to identify complex problems and verify any related information in order to evaluate options and implement them.

  • Good Knowledge in Mathematics

You should have keen know-how regarding arithmetic, geometry, calculus and statistics and their applications.

  • Good Mechanical Knowledge

You should know how to operate machines and equipment and also must have knowledge about their designs and the ways to repair them.

You have seen what skills are required to work as a demolition expert, but do you think this job is suitable for you?

Take A Look at The Pros and Cons of Working In This Field:

 Pros

  • It is suitable for those who like practical hands-on work.
  • It is suitable for those who like to work outdoors.
  • It requires a person to work in teams and hence is suitable for those who like to work in supportive groups.

Cons

It is not suitable for those who are not willing to work for long hours as this job takes up to 40 hours per week.

Hopefully, this guide can help you as it almost covers everything that you need to know about pursuing a career as a demolition expert.

 

Small Tips to Increase Safety at Work Nobody Thinks Of


Small Tips to Increase Safety at Work Nobody Thinks Of

Small business owners often put safety at the back of their minds and concentrate more on the actual work and finances. Some even believe that safety risks at their workplace are equal to nothing and that safety is the point where they could save money. However, it’s not true; any workplace has some safety risks, and even if they are minimal, you still have to eliminate even the smallest chance of injury. After all, your employees are your primary attribute, and without them, the company doesn’t exist.

To help you run your job easier and safer, we wrote a list of suggestions that should help you in your daily work.

Safety Tips for Your Company

 Clean Working Area

Keeping your working area clean is the number one thing you should do to ensure safe working conditions. As trivial as it sounds, keeping the mess away can have a massive influence on safety. A mess can cause injuries such as falls or slips. It would be best if you would keep the working area dry and free of objects that might cause the fall. Your workers will also keep the area clean if you warn them that it’s for their own safety!

Don’t Hire Anyone

If the business is going great, there is a chance you will probably need more workers. This might put you in the position to quickly hire someone. However, this decision might have significant consequences on the overall safety of your workplace. Hiring someone without necessary skills could increase a safety risk, not just for you and your workers, but for others as well. Instead, pick someone with enough experience and don’t have a hiring spree. By hiring a competent person, you will also increase the safety.

Invest in Education

It is very important to give proper instructions to your new workers. Even if they are skilled and have plenty of experience in that field of business, you should ensure that everything is clear, and warn them about the safety tips. Instead of just counting on their experience, it might be a good idea to teach them using proper techniques. Also, consider investing in educating your employees. Continual training won’t just improve their work, but it will also profoundly affect the overall safety of your workplace.

Provide High-Quality Tools and Equipment

It is not realistic to expect your employees to perform their best and practice safety without proper tools or equipment. Providing staff with the right equipment will make their job much easier, and at the same time allow them to work faster. For instance, shoes are essential safety equipment for roofers, since they assure them a bigger range of motion and more stability. Therefore, safety equipment can profoundly affect the efficiency of your employees.

Place Safety Signs

Even if you already explained all the safety tips and caution rules, your staff might simply forget something. This is where the sign system comes in and does wonders. Posting signs which remind of safety precautions can significantly help in making your workplace safer. Signs don’t have to ruin the aesthetics or transparency of your office or job site. These can be just some small signs, and they’ll still have a significant effect.

Ensure Correctly Maintained Tools and Equipment

Last but not least is maintaining your machines, tools, and equipment. This is one of many crucial steps to success. Ensure your working machines are well maintained and properly repaired. Poor devices decrease the productivity of your team, and handling an improper machine could also have fatal consequences for your workers.

 

Safety in the Lab – Essential Equipment You Need

Safety in the Lab – Essential Equipment You Need

Any laboratory that practises good safety will take care to ensure it has the right equipment on hand at all times.

No matter the industry – pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, industrial engineering or food production – the same safety precautions must be taken to create a safe, productive and enjoyable working environment for all.

Below are some of the main safety clothing and equipment that should be found in most laboratories. Though the needs and requirements of labs will vary, many of these will lend themselves to a variety of processes and uses.

The equipment can be roughly categorised into three groups:

–          General PPE (used daily)

–          General purpose equipment

–          Specialised equipment, if required.

General PPE

  1. Safety shoes/boots        Safety shoes or boots are used for a number of reasons in the lab.

First, they improve grip performance on the lab floor, helping to avoid slips and trips.

Second, they protect the feet against falling heavy or sharp objects, which would otherwise puncture normal shoes.

Safety boots incorporate protective toe caps as well as other protective features such as slip-resistant soles and insulation against extremes. Safety shoes, meanwhile, incorporate protective toe caps like boots but are available metal-free as “composite footwear”. This makes them much more lightweight.

There are many different types of safety shoes on the market, which can make choosing the right ones overwhelming. However, all in all, safety shoes must:

–          Meet the legal requirements

–          Be the correct type for the task or worker

–          Be sued or worn correctly by all staff required.

Safety shoes ideally need to be slip-resistant, avoid static build-up and suit the main contaminants and surfaces in your workplace.

  1.    Safety Glasses/Goggles

Safety glasses and goggles protect against foreign objects that may splash into the eye, as well as cuts and scrapes to the cornea.

Some of the most common workplace injuries happen to the eyes, 90% of which could be easily avoided by the correct safety eyewear being worn.

The most common types of eye injury include splashes from grease and oil; burns from steam; ultraviolet or infrared radiation exposure, and flying wood or metal chips.

Also, some lab staff may be at risk of acquiring infectious diseases from eye exposure.

Types of safety eyewear include:

–          Safety glasses with side shields (worn in areas with flying particles and dust)

–          Goggles (work when working with chemicals)

–          Special-purpose safety glasses, goggles, face shields or helmets (for working near hazardous radiation).

Eyewear should be selected based on the hazards of each activity. Prescription safety glasses are also available for those that usually wear spectacles, with safety glasses having much stronger lenses and frames than regular glasses.

The most common materials for safety glasses are plastic, polycarbonate and Trivex, with polycarbonate offering the most protection.

  1.    Safety Gloves

As with other PPE, safety gloves need to be suited to the hazards workers will be working with. They will usually be made of nitrile or latex, depending on allergies, but different gloves are more suited to different types of chemicals.

Glove selection can be determined by:

–          Chemical type

–          Temperature extremes and cryogenic properties

–          Physical hazards (piercing objects)

–          pH

–          Toxicity

–          Infectious potential of biological hazards.

It’s also necessary to consider whether contact with the chemical will be incidental or extended.

If the contact will be incidental (short-lived), disposable gloves are usually fine. Nitrile gloves are generally preferred over latex due to their chemical resistance and easy visibility when ripped.

If contact will be extended, norfoil gloves are recommended for highly toxic or easily absorbed through skin. These are usually reusable, but must be washed, left to air-dry and checked for punctures and tips after each use.

  1.    Lab Coat

A lab coat should fit properly and chosen according to the type of hazard and chemicals. There are various styles available, including women’s fit and varying sleeve lengths, so it’s always possible to find the fit you need.

Lab coats should be worn in the work area at all times buttoned or snapped, with the sleeves rolled down. They should be removed whenever one exits the work area, for example, when leaving work or going to the restroom.

If contaminated by spills or splashes, the lab coat should be removed immediately and disposed of as hazardous waste. They come in a range of materials – from flame-resistant Nomex and cotton, to traditional materials like polycotton blends and polyester (a good barrier).

General Purpose Equipment

 5. Fume Extraction

Fume extraction can be acquired in the form of either a cabinet or localised fume hood.

When choosing between the two, a hazard analysis will need to be done first of all to see what contaminants need to be removed, as well as air monitoring, which will determine what chemicals workers are exposed to.

The pertinent data obtained will determine what type of fume extraction system you need.

Ducted hood extraction systems are ventilated enclosures, where the ducting connects to the outside so contaminants are pulled out of the building. They are safe and easy to maintain and usually made up of a base, work surface, hood, blower and ducting.

Biosafety cabinets are another form of fume extraction that use HEPA filtration. They are categorised by three classes:

  • Class I – air is drawn away from the lab worker and across the work surface
  • Class II – air is drawn safely around operator, whilst sterile air flows downwards onto the work surface and exhaust air is HEPA filtered before either being recirculated into the lab or released into the atmosphere through ductwork or a canopy.
  • Class III – a gas-tight enclosure, with both intake of air and exhaust air passing through HEPA filtration.

Biosafety cabinets provide a safe environment for the research and examination of infectious microorganisms or other hazardous particulates.

Specialised Equipment

Full Face Respirators

These are highly recommended for all clandestine lab decontamination jobs, as eyes and nostrils can be an entry point for hazardous chemicals.

It is important to choose the right type of respirator. In secondary areas (where contamination has spread but no actual cooking took place), it may be acceptable to wear a half-face respirator with protective glasses.

Consider also the type of filter to be used with the respirator. Some only work in certain situations; for example, clan lab remediation jobs require the use of an ammonia filter.

  1. Tyvek Suits

When it comes to protective suits, Tyvek make an excellent choice. As the trusted leader for a variety of products, Tyvek suits offers high protection along with comfort, being made from versatile materials which are tough yet lightweight.

Tyvek’s creator DuPoint are widely known for their extensive testing against things like inward leakage, penetration and permeation. The suits are an excellent barrier against liquids and aerosols, are anti statically treated, and are “low linting” thanks to the non-woven fabric.

Because Tyvek suits aren’t made from films or laminates that can wear off over time, they are extremely long-lasting and abrasion-resistant.

Tyvek suits can provide protection against chemicals, oils, liquids, dust particles and fibres and airborne elements. They can be used for a variety of scenarios, including chemical safety, pharmaceuticals, biological hazard protection and chemical protection.

Different suits are tailored to different hazards, so as with anything else, always determine the type of hazard and select the correct suit accordingly.

  1. Dust Mask

Processes such as grinding, sieving sediment or plant materials or polishing can generate fine dust particles in the air.

Dust masks protect against these particles, which can be potentially harmful, and cause allergic reactions and asthma, if these processes cannot be carried out in a fume cupboard.

Dust masks can also be worn when handling or transferring powders in bulk.

  1. Chemical Absorbant granules

Chemical spill cleanup is something that must always be planned for in any lab, with the right tools on hand to control and manage spills when they occur.

Different industries require different types of spill cleanup processes, but chemical absorbent granules serve many different purposes and carry many advantages over other spill cleanup substances, with a simplistic and flexible application to small spills.

There are a few different types od chemical absorbent granules on the market. These are:

  • Multi-zorb – an industrial spillage absorbant quality granule clay. Multi-zorb absorbs spillages without granular breakdown, and is clean, dry and safe.
  • New Safety thread – this is non-marking, non-dusting, and suitable for strong chemicals.
  • Light Plus – paper pellet granules.
  • E-Sorb – fire retardant wood fibre granules.
  • ELCEF fibre – biodegradable oil selective fibre.
  1. Saline Eye wash

The first 10-15 seconds after a hazardous chemical coming into contact with the eye can often be the most critical. If immediate flushing is carried out, this greatly minimises the likelihood of any serious damage being done.

Emergency eyewash stations provide on-the-spot decontamination, helping workers flush away hazardous substances that can cause injury to the eye. They are an essential addition to the lab as they provide a necessary backup in the case of exposure to chemicals.

Saline is a very popular “flushing fluid” that is medically approved, and often used as a solution for eye washes.

The worker should use the eye wash station to flush the eyes for a minimum of 15 minutes, or 20 minutes if substance is not known.

The total flushing time may vary for different types of chemicals. For example, non-irritable substances may be flushed for only five minutes, whilst corrosives will need 30 and strong alkalis will need to be flushed for 60 minutes.

Whilst flushing, the user must keep eyes open and rotate numerous times in all directions to thoroughly remove the contamination.

About ReAgent

ReAgent has been producing chemicals for the food and construction industries for the last 40 years. As well as the supply of raw chemicals and materials, they also specialise in the production of chemical solutions, mixing, blending, filling and packing.

ReAgent is particularly proud of its high quality policies and transparent working relationship with its customers.

They are currently ISO accredited in both the 9001 Quality Standard and 14001 Environmental Standard, and are proactively working towards accreditation in ISO 45001 Occupational Health & Safety Standard.

How to be Safe in The Trade Industry – A Professional Guide

Working in trade is tough and each job comes with its own challenges and tasks that make it unique. From plumbers to builders you have to be skilled, qualified but most importantly, safe. Safety in the workplace has become a huge part of a day to day trade now and each profession is different. Lucky for you, we have teamed up with TradesmenTricks.com to provide a guide on safety for some of the top trades in the industry.

 Plumber

There are many aspects of being a plumber which can cause danger which will need equipment to prevent hazardous materials damaging items of clothing or even skin.

Full overalls or protective clothing is required, with minimal points that can be caught by obstructions as this can cause an issue if caught on nails for example. When working with possible electrical currents, non-conductive clothing should be worn for the safety of the plumber. The eyes should also be protected from sparks, drips, and dust, and leather or latex gloves are a necessity to guard against any injury to the hands or contact with hazardous or unpleasant materials.

Electrician

Electricians are tasked with a whole host of jobs and tasks including fitting, repairing and inspections just to name a few. Often working in confined spaces and will handle dangerous products which can cause electric shocks! So, remaining safe with PPE is vital.

Electricians should be equipped with rubber insulating gloves, with liner gloves used inside to diminish discomfort and leather protective gloves optionally worn over the top to protect against cuts, scratches, and punctures. Gloves should fit well and maintain flexibility to allow for dexterous handling of smaller items.

Plasterer

From walls and ceilings appliance to overseeing larger projects on construction site, plasterers are working with equipment which can cause damage to clothing and risk to the tradesmen’s health and well-being. With risks of developing problems such as rhinitis which can be solved by using a face mask to avoid breathing in harmful air containing dust.

Dust can also cause damage to the eyes so an eye mask or goggles and the perfect protective item to prevent danger, along with a hard hat being used at all times.

Plasterers can also be exposed to chemicals through skin contact, so full-body coverings are recommended, as are thick gloves to prevent injuring or irritating the hands.

Carpenter

Carpenters are in need of major protection as coming in contact with wood is dangerous. Producing sawdust, wood chipping and splinters are just a few minor risks. With working with power tools which can cause harm to the worker which will need protecting against also.

Anyone working extensively with wood needs to protect both their eyes and their ears. On-site carpentry involves lots of cutting and shaping, so safety glasses should be used to prevent sawdust invading the eyes, and proper hearing protectors must guard against the constant noise created by power tools.

Power tools are also a danger but can’t be avoided for the job, we recommend making sure that the surface you work on is clear and no obstructions are around which could lead to dangerous complications.

Post provided by  Oliver at  TradesmenTricks

A Safety-First Approach to Refueling a Forklift

A Safety-First Approach to Refueling a Forklift

Acute inhalation of carbon monoxide (CO) gas is considered to be one of the most frequent causes of occupational fatality in the United States, according to an article published by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), US National Library of Medicine (NLM). The fact that CO is a colorless and odorless gas makes it extremely hard to detect and therefore it is also dubbed as “the silent killer.”

According to the NCBI/NLM resource, fuel-powered forklifts are one of the common sources of CO poisoning. It is, therefore, extremely important for an employer to put in adequate safeguards around the use of forklifts, especially during the refueling process.

Even a small thing like using a high-quality safety valve can help prevent accidents during forklift refueling, which involves the use of dangerous gases. For instance, experts at Clark Cooper recommend a specific solenoid valve for hydrogen gas that can withstand its greater pressures, in comparison to other liquids or gases.

Follow OSHA Guidelines to the Letter

Did you know that workplace forklift training is governed by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), under the US Department of Labor? There is already a set of guidelines by OSHA that act as best practices that every industrial unit should follow. These include forklifts with:

ü      Internal Combustion Engines

While forklifts with internal combustion engines are easier to refuel, a great amount of caution needs to be exercised while doing so to avoid spills and leaks. Here are some best practices to consider:

  • As a standard operating procedure, all hydraulics must be checked beforehand, along with the levels of oil and water, even before commencing the refueling operation.
  • It is a good time to check for any leaks that might have occurred in the battery, cylinder or fuel system.
  • Adequate ventilation is important and therefore the refueling must not occur in an area that is poorly ventilated.
  • You must be alert to unusual noises or excessive vibrations.
  • The color of the exhaust can reveal a lot. For instance, black smoke might be a sign of incomplete combustion.

ü      Liquid Petroleum Gas

  • Avoid confined areas, since LPG is heavier than air and can collect in low lying areas, thereby increasing the chances of an explosion, when it is accidentally exposed to heat.
  • LPG trucks must not be parked near heat sources.
  • The service valve must always be turned off when the forklift is parked for a long period of time.
  • LPG containers must always be handled by trained and authorized personnel only.

ü      Diesel and Gasoline

  • Safe locations should be earmarked for the refueling operation, preferably outdoors.
  • Refueling should not be carried out near heat sources, since that could lead to an explosion.
  • The engine must be switched off during the refueling process.
  • Transmission must be put to Neutral and the parking brakes applied.
  • No one should smoke while the refueling is in progress.
  • Keep an eye on the fuel levels. Avoid letting the forklift run out of fuel completely or being too low on fuel, since sediments can be drawn into the fuel system.
  • Do not fill the tank right to the top. Leave some space because fuel tends to expand when heated.

In addition, you must also be aware of the safety instructions as prescribed in the operator’s manual and comply with those guidelines as well. Remember, it is a federal offense for anyone below the age of 18 to operate an industrial forklift or for anyone above 18 years to operate it without proper training and certification.

Workplace Plumbing Safety Tips

Following the correct guidelines when performing any plumbing ask is essential to ensuring complete safety for yourself and whomever you are doing the work for. Knowing about your responsibilities as a employee and also if you are an employer, knowing what you have to do is critical to be sure you are abiding by the law with all the work you, and your company does.

 

Main Employer Responsibilities

 

  • the provision and maintenance of plant and systems of work that are safe and without risk to health (this includes the supply of all necessary personal protective equipment)

  • safety in the use, handling, storage and transport of articles and substances

  • the provision of information, instruction, training and supervision as necessary to ensure the health and safety at work of employees

  • the provision of access to and exit from the workplace that is safe and without risk

  • the provision of adequate facilities and arrangements for welfare at work.

  • provide a health and safety policy statement

  • undertake regular risk assessments

Main Employee Responsibilities

  • take reasonable care at work of your own health and safety and that of others who may be affected by what you do or do not do

  • do not intentionally or recklessly interfere with or misuse anything provided for your health and safety

  • co-operate with your employer on health and safety matters. Assist your employer in meeting their statutory obligations

  • bring to your employer’s attention any situation you think presents a serious and imminent danger

  • bring to your employer’s attention any weakness you might spot in their health and safety arrangements.

As a plumber it is necessary you understand what types of actions are to be taken by you or your employee in order to keep the workplace or worksite safe at all times, there are statutory regulations in place in order to keep safety to a maximum and to make sure you do not have any law suits coming your
way.

 Some of the actions taken to keep safety to a high are risk assessments, method statements and permit to work statements. The permit to work statement is a list of checks which you would carry out before taking on any dangerous plumbing jobs
like going up high to fix a broken pipe.

When
on site it is important to lay down a list of requirements for safety. If you are on a plumbing job which may take you a few days, it is essential to make sure your plumbers read these before working on the site. Some regulations to take into consideration can be found below.

 generally ensuring a safe place of work

  • precautions against falls from height or into excavations

  • protection against falling objects

  • protection against structural collapse (while work is taking place), i.e. the building falling down! safeguards when working in excavations

  • prevention of drowning (falling into water)

  • provision of safe traffic routes (on sites)

  • prevention and control of emergencies (site emergency evacuation procedures, etc.)

  • provision of welfare facilities – WCs, washing facilities, canteens/rest areas, shower facilities (if required)

  • provision of site-wide issues – clean and tidy sites, adequate lighting, constant and fresh air supply, etc.

  • training, inspection and reports – proper training of staff, use of properly trained staff to do the work, proper supervision of staff and monitoring the work carried out by staff to ensure it is carried out in a safe manner.

 

Plumbing safety tips

To ensure you always stay safe when working, it is best to follow these simple, yet somewhat obvious instructions.

  • Do not walk under a ladder that has somebody working up it

  • Wear the correct safety equipment (ie boots, hard hats etc.)

  • Always make sure to not work with plumbing issues near electric whilst power is on, turn all power off to prevent anything tragic happening

  • Make sure you have received full training on the job you are about to undergo

  • Do not work if tired as many times we have seen work going wrong due to sleep deprivation

  • Follow the correct health and safety guidelines (mentioned above)

  • Be sure to use the correct tools for the job to ensure you complete it safely

 Author Bio

This article was written by Dan Mawson who is the owner and founder of Multicore emergency plumber wigan.

He is an avid blogger, plumber, electrician and web developer hoping to share his knowledge through the web.

 

How to safely handle chemicals?

How to safely handle chemicals?

Keeping your workers safe inside your facility should always be your number one priority, especially when it comes to dealing with chemical products. We all know that these products have to be handled and stored cautiously. Therefore, if you want your employees to work in good and safe conditions, here are a few tips that may be of some use to you:

First of all it is important that all your personnel wear the proper PPE (Personal Protective Equipment); glasses, gloves, protective helmets, masks, and so on. Some chemicals can be toxic or corrosive, it is thus compulsory for your workers to be protected from the potential dangers related to their handling, not only from a safety point of view but also from a legislative point of view.

Never skip on the training. You have to teach your employees how to react in case of emergency, what kind of action should be taken in case of spill, or if a product or a part of the facility catches fire. Indeed, chemical incidents can happen very fast and it is necessary to be able to react quickly in order to prevent the situation from getting worse. This article (http://www.itv.com/news/anglia/2017-03-18/leisure-centre-staff-created-gas-cloud-as-they-tried-to-mix-chlorine/) tells us how a gas cloud was created after two chemicals were mixed together in a swimming pool. Thankfully the employees were able to take the right decision, and immediately evacuated and closed the leisure center. This goes to show us how important it is for the personnel to be aware of the measures that have to be taken in case of emergency.

Also, make sure that all your chemical products are properly labelled so that your employees get all the information needed when they are handling them. A label usually specifies the name of the product, the risks and the safety measures linked to its use, as well as the name and contact details of the manufacturer. This information will allow your workers to quickly understand what type of product they are dealing with, which will help them handle them the proper way.

We could not end this post without talking about the fact that all chemicals cannot and should not be stored together. They all have their special features; this is why an explosive product should never be kept in the same place as a flammable product. There is no need to be a scientist to know what kind of reaction would occur if these two products were to come into contact. Moreover, some chemicals have to be kept in specific conditions; in a cold or in a well-ventilated place, and so on… Make sure you are abreast with such requirements so that the security in your workplace is optimal. Also, if you know your facility does not own the infrastructure necessary to the storage of chemicals, you can hire the services of specialized companies such as Barnastock (http://www.barnastock.com/en) which warehouses were designed in order to safely store all types of chemical products.

 

 

5+ safety tips for construction workers!


5+ safety tips for construction workers!

The construction job is one of the greatest and, at the same time, one of the riskiest jobs in the world. When you are constructing buildings, you are probably helping thousands of dreams to realize or you are just becoming the reason for providing someone’s haven. This is the part construction become a humane job, a great one. But at the same time, you are probably risking your life every moment you are on the job. Accidents, injuries and stress – you will frequently come across these words if you are in the construction job. And if you are unlucky enough, death is another word that you probably had to hear. It is needless to say that you must take all and every step that ensures your safety – EVRERYDAY!

Your safety precaution should encompass everything that you need to protect your body from – from the tools you work with, the scaffolding, the chemicals, and the piles of construction garbage to your habit of drinking! Here are a few tips that you might start with –

Tip 1: Learn!

Yes – that’s the first and most important things you can do to ensure your safety. And I am not just talking about what safety steps you should take – I am also talking about the escape and exit routes at your workplace; the location of the fire extinguisher and how to use one; the use of first aid kit. Ask your employer to do training if s/he hasn’t yet done one. Ask them to point out places that pose the greatest risk for the workers.

Tip 2: Have a look around

That’s the first rule of safety. As you reach your workplace, just take five minutes and look for any possible sign of danger – check the scaffolding, make sure the ladders are strong enough, test the equipments you work with. If you find something wonky, just inform your employer. Keep your eyes open. You might save yourself and a lot of lives too. Look for any

Tip 3: Wear the right clothes  

And the right gears too! The safety clothing and equipments you put on are known as Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) in the construction business.  The reflective vest, helmet and safety shoes save you from falling objects and sharp tools decreasing the risks of injury to the largest extent. Safety glasses and face masks protect you from hazardous and chemical substances.

Tip 4: Clean the garbage

As soon as you have finished the day’s work, do not make any delay to remove the refuse. Stack of construction garbage increases the risks of injury and if it contains any chemical or hazardous waste, it might set off big accidents.

Tip 5: Do have a lot of water and nutritious food too

That’s the basic rule to protect your health. This might sound like a lame tip. But trust me – if you start consuming more water, you will feel less tired than earlier as you finish your job for the day.

Tip 6: Talk to your workmates

Yes – talk to your workmates, make plans what you would do if someone faces an accident or injury and vice versa. Think of all the possible things you could do if someone gets into an accident – what your immediate action would be, who to inform, which immediate care you could provide. This would have two effects – the more you talk, the better prepared you would be and the less worried you would get if you face such situations. And second, you know you have a person you can lean on in your bad time!

Tip 7: Carry a First Aid Kit with you

You can provide emergency care service if you carry one. And who knows you might even save a life!

And last, but the best piece of advice – make a checklist of your personal safety rules.  Follow it religiously. No one but you can care best for yourself and for your workmates too!

How To Maintain A NIOSH/OSHA Safe Workplace?

How To Maintain A NIOSH/OSHA Safe Workplace?

 

One of the primary responsibilities of every business or employer is to fully implement an effective safety and health program in the workplace. A properly managed workplace safety program shows commitment to the safety of workers by the management. This, in turn, creates a more productive workplace that maintains the highest standards for safety and health.

As an employer, you’re responsible for ensuring that your business is in full compliance with the latest safety and health regulations set out by the law. The Occupational Safety and Health Association (OSHA) and the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) oversee the implementation and promotion of occupational health and safety programs that help prevent injuries, illnesses, and deaths in the workplace.

How do you maintain a NIOSH/OSHA safe workplace?

Identify Hazards in Your Workplace

You can do this by evaluating all occupational roles in your business, the work involved, and the tools and equipment used. For instance, hazards may include technicians working with heavy machinery, a warehouse worker stacking heavy boxes, or a janitor working with cleaning chemicals.

With a good understanding of the various hazards and risks that your workers and employees are exposed to, you can now take steps to minimize or eliminate them to ensure their health and safety.

Develop a Safety Plan and Do Drills

Once you have identified workplace hazards, you need to develop a safety plan. Your plan must comply with the latest NIOSH/OSHA standards, rules, and regulations. Ensure that all your employees understand what needs to be done should there be a health or safety crisis in the workplace. A written plan of action should be formulated and included in your business policies and operational procedures.

Regular vetting of your safety plan must be done with the involvement of managers, supervisors, and employees. It’s not enough to simply have a safety plan in place. To ensure it can be implemented, carry out drills at least once or twice a year so as to practice on what to do and where to go in case of a safety hazard or an emergency.

Inspect Your Workplace and Review Safety Procedures

Regularly check your workplace tools and equipment to ensure that they are in good condition and safe to use. Are your employees properly trained and updated on how to handle equipment safely? Make sure that you also review all workplace operational and safety procedures. If you have invested in new safety equipment such as Moldex-Metric hearing protection or respiratory masks, are your workers aware of the updated safety procedures?

Being in the know of how your entire workplace operates and what measures are in place to ensure employee safety is critical.

Train Your Workers and Teach Awareness

Investing in proper health and safety training is necessary for all employees. Train them on safe working procedures and teach awareness. Training is best done on an on-going basis and should be offered in a simple, practical and easy-to-understand way.

Provide written instructions and other resources like online training and conduct regular supervisions to ensure employees are performing their jobs as expected and safely.

Communicate Safety Procedures Clearly

Communicating the safety procedures required in your workplace clearly is important. Make use of safety posters, data sheets, color codes, signs or labels to communicate to workers and warn them of potential hazards. Established operating procedures should also be communicated in the same way to remind employees of health and safety requirements.

Talk to Leaders and Employees

Maintaining a safe workplace is a collective effort that involves everyone from business owners to managers and employees. Meet your staff regularly to discuss health and safety issues. Encourage sharing of thoughts and ideas and how to improve workplace safety. You may even want to provide first aid training for all employees so that they can better handle emergencies.

Report, Record, and Investigate Incidents

It’s important to report all work-related fatalities to your nearest regulatory bodies such as OSHA or NIOSH. You should also keep all records of workplace-related injuries and illnesses, incident investigations, inspections, and health and safety training activities. Conducting investigations in any type of incident, however small, can help you determine why it happened so you can take preventative measures.

Adopt a Comprehensive Injury and Illness Prevention Program

OSHA encourages all employers to adopt programs that play a critical role in reducing the number and severity of workplace-related injuries, illnesses and deaths. Check with your state to clarify if there are specific requirements or guidelines for workplace injury and illness prevention programs for your small, medium or large business.

With the right prevention program in place, your business will see reduced cases of injuries, illnesses, fatalities and even compensation claims. It’s important to make safety a key part of your business so as to maintain a NIOSH/OSHA safe workplace.

The Bottom Line

With the recently updated OSHA guidelines for safety and health programs, employers in a wide variety of business settings and industries are adopting and implementing the recommended practices. These practices incorporate a proactive approach that helps you manage workplace safety and health, ensuring a safer and more productive working environment for everyone.

Author Bio:

Carolyn Clarke is a lead safety consultant and occupational health and safety expert who writes for a number of authority health and safety websites and blogs. She provides professional guidance and training around the use of personal protective equipment in specialist business settings. She also works with clients to create safe working environments for employees and workers and is a certified Occupational Safety and Health Technician.

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Safety Precautions to Take When Working with Electronic Equipment

Safety Precautions to Take When Working with Electronic Equipment

   

Safety Can be Confusing
Safety Can be Confusing

 

When working with or testing any electronic equipment, it’s always important to be cautious. Whatever type of equipment you’re handling, whether simple or complex, it’s important to take the right safety precautions.  

Working with electricity comes with huge risks that should never be taken lightly. If you’re a hobbyist who loves working with electronic components or an electronics professional at your workplace, safety should always come first.

 To avoid personal injury, possible damage to equipment or danger of fire, all work on electronic equipment should be conducted following these safety procedures.

 General Safety

 Before working on any electronics, consider following these basic safety precautions to help reduce any hazards.

           Remove any electronic equipment you’re testing or working on from the power source.

           Never assume the power circuit is off. Test and test again with a voltmeter to confirm.

           Remove fuses and replace them only after the power to the circuit is disconnected.

           Don’t connect power to a circuit until you’re done working on it and rechecked the work.

           Always ensure that all electronics equipment is properly grounded

            If it’s damaged, replace it. For instance, replace cables instead of repairing with insulating tape.

            Always use the right electronics repair and maintenance tools.

            Always return covers after removing them to reduce the risk of electric shock. 

           Make sure your circuit is not overloaded.

            Always have safety equipment like a fire extinguisher, a basic first aid kit and a mobile phone nearby.

 Personal Safety

 It’s important to ensure that you’re safe when working on electronic circuits. Here are some personal safety precautions to keep in mind: 

           Always keep your work area dry.  

           Always work in a well-ventilated area. 

           Don’t wear flapping or loose clothing when working. 

           Don’t work with metallic jewelry on your hands like watches, rings and bracelets.  

           Don’t use bare hands to remove hot parts. 

           Always wear non-conductive shoes. 

           Always wear insulator gloves in your hands when carrying out repairs. 

           When removing high-voltage charges on capacitors, always use a shorting stick. 

           Don’t hold the test prods when measuring voltage over 300V. 

           Always remove power to a circuit before connecting alligator clips. 

           Always wear safety goggles.  

           Be careful when handling large capacitors as they can still hold high voltage even after you’ve disconnected the circuit from power.

 High Voltage Safety

 One mistake that electronics experts make when doing repairs or maintenance work is assuming routine safety procedures after getting all too familiar with their work. It’s important to know that most electronic equipment use high-voltage that is dangerous and can be fatal. Always follow these safety precautions when working on or near high-voltage circuits.

            Don’t work on electronic equipment or make repairs with high voltage on. 

           Don’t take chances doing what you’re not sure about. 

           Consider using an isolation transformer when working on AC powered electronic circuits or equipment. 

           Never tamper with interlocks. 

           Don’t ground yourself: Make it a practice to use only one hand when connecting equipment to an electronic circuit.   

 

HighVoltagePowerSupply

Fire Safety Precautions 

When working with electronic equipment, there is often a risk of fire caused by a short circuit or other reason. Follow these precautionary steps: 

           Avoid anything that would cause a fire around your working area like paper, cloth or other combustible materials. 

           Look out for damaged wire insulation, overheating of electronic equipment, damaged circuit boards and corrosive components like batteries.  

           If there is a burning smell on your electronic equipment, disconnect the power source. 

           If there is a fire, use a nonconducting dry powder or CO2 fire extinguisher.  

           Always check your circuit to be sure that everything is okay after repairs or maintenance before connecting power.  

Electric Shock

 One of the major hazards when working with electronic equipment is electric shock. To avoid this, you should take a few safety precautions, including: 

           Always read safety procedures that come with every electronic equipment you’re about to test or work on.  

           Recheck all wires for bad connections

            Always make sure that all parts of electronic equipment are well-mounted to prevent accidents.  

           Keep electronic equipment away from water and other liquids 

           Always check for signs of wear, defects and fraying on electronic equipment cables, cords and connectors.  

           Use special safety rubber gloves and shoes. 

Testing Equipment 

With the increasing use of electronics in homes and workplaces, safety is becoming more and more important to consumers and service experts. If you’re an electronics expert offering repair and maintenance services, it’s important to invest in the right new or used testing equipment for your work—that ensures that you’re able to carry out your job safely.

 

 

Author Bio:

Arnold Sharpe is a freelance writer and an electronics expert working with the leading electronic testing equipment store in Los Angeles, CA. He reviews the latest home and office electronic equipment in the market.

 

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