Category Archives: Fall Safety

5 ways to reduce injuries in the workplace

5 ways to reduce injuries in the workplace

With more than 80,000 workers suffering from work-related ill health each year in the construction sector alone, more needs to be done to avoid workplace accidents. In addition to the financial costs, such as loss of production, absence from work, and healthcare costs, the total costs of workplace injuries includes both the financial costs and valuation of human costs. Understanding and preventing risks is the first step to avoiding accidents and protecting workers. Below are 5 top tips to minimize workplace injuries.

  1. Wear PPE

PPE is one of the most important piece of equipment to protect the user against risks. These include items such as safety helmets, gloves, eye protection, high-visibility clothing and safety footwear etc. Although PPE contributes to a safer workplace, a staggering 98% of employees have said they have seen others in their workplace not wearing the correct PPE equipment due to poor fit, lack of accessibility and discomfort.

As an employer, it is your legal duty to provide a safe work environment. Under the Personal Protective Equipment at work regulations 1992, employers must take reasonable steps to ensure that the PPE provided is used properly and responsibly.

PPE should be:

  • Properly assessed before use to make sure it’s fit for purpose
  • Maintained and stored properly
  • Provided with instructions on how to use it safely
  • Used correctly by employees.

Although often overlooked, workers should also receive adequate training on the correct use, fit, care and storage of their PPE.

  1. Creating a safe workplace

Common work practices may lead to work injuries and it is always best to deal with any hazards promptly. According to the HSE, slips and falls account for 24% of workplace accidents.

This is mainly caused by preventable dangers such as slippery floor surfaces, trailing cables and poor lighting. Preventative measures is usually straightforward, so act quickly and mop up any spillages, repair broken steps and encourage staff to report maintenance faults straightaway so this can be fixed.

  1. Creating a culture of safety

Employers have a duty to protect and tell you about health and safety issues that affect you. It is important to communicate health and safety policies to all staff. This might be by including information in training, induction packs, staff handbooks or posting it on the notice board. By creating a culture of safety, employees are educated and understand the important of health and safety at work.

Proper training of employees can also mitigate the threat of injuries. Informed, educated employees are less likely to be involved in accidents because they are aware of and informed about potential hazards.

Policies should also be reviewed at least once a year or more often to keep up to date with legislation.

  1. Carry out a risk assessment

Prevention is the best cure. All businesses are obliged to carry out a health and safety risk assessment to identify the potential hazards in the workplace. By undertaking a risk assessment, this provides guidance to help businesses understand what they need to do to assess and control risks in the workplace and comply with health and safety law.

Risk assessments reduce accidents by formally looking at an area at work, identifying the hazards that are there, then looking at the possible accidents or injury that could take place. For example, are employees required to carry heavy items or work from height? It is important to keep a written record of your risk assessment and any steps you take to reduce the chance of accidents.

 Clear signage

Clearly marked signage in all potentially dangerous areas are required by law to inform employees of potential risks. Even if it is not required for your small business, these signs can be an invaluable tool in protecting employees and warn them of the hazards.

It is important that employers ensure that their employees are aware of and understand the meaning of safety signs and signals either seen or heard during their work, including providing training where necessary.

Article provided by Nexon Hygiene.

Here Is What It Takes for You to Become A Demolition Expert

Here Is What It Takes for You to Become A Demolition Expert

 Did you ever wonder what does a demolition expert do?

Are you interested in pursuing this career, but have no idea what are the formalities involved with this job?

Firstly, you need to know who a demolition expert is, and only then can you know what they do.

Demolition experts or explosive workers are managers of any construction work and are experts in every sort of demolition work.

Now, what do they specialize in?                                            

They just don’t break things, if that is what you are thinking, a lot is involved here. Some of the important activities, an explosive worker undertakes are:

  • Decision Making and Problem Solving

They analyze and assess a problem and evaluates the results, based on which the most suitable solution is chosen to solve the problem.

  • Acquiring Information

They are required to make observations about their project and organize information based on that.

  • Documentation of Information

They are responsible for storing and recording the acquired information in the magnetic or electronic form.

  • Handling and Transporting Objects

A demolition expert is required to physically install, reposition, and move objects and also manipulate them.

  • Operation of Vehicles and Equipment

They are required to drive and navigate vehicles or mechanized automobiles like forklifts, aircraft, and cranes.

These are just to name a few. Seems like a lot of responsibilities, doesn’t it?

Now the next question is what the educational qualifications you would require for this job?

A traditional college degree is not necessary to become a demolition expert. You can, of course, have additional merit if you graduate with a bachelor’s degree in engineering or construction.

This might not seem much, but a person requires a lot of skills to become a demolition expert. Do you think you have what it takes?

Find it out yourself!

 

The necessary skills required to pursue this career are as follows:

  • Keen Observation and Monitoring Skills

You need to monitor and assess your performance and other performances, in order to make necessary improvements or corrections.

  • Ability to Critical Think and Analyze

You need to have sharp thinking skills and make use of your logic to analyze the weaknesses and strengths of various solutions, inferences and approaches to any problem in order to choose the best possible option for them.

  • Good Judgment and Decision-Making Skills

You need to be able to analyze the relative costs and benefits of any project and choose the most suitable one.

  • Complex Problem-Solving Skills

You should be able to identify complex problems and verify any related information in order to evaluate options and implement them.

  • Good Knowledge in Mathematics

You should have keen know-how regarding arithmetic, geometry, calculus and statistics and their applications.

  • Good Mechanical Knowledge

You should know how to operate machines and equipment and also must have knowledge about their designs and the ways to repair them.

You have seen what skills are required to work as a demolition expert, but do you think this job is suitable for you?

Take A Look at The Pros and Cons of Working In This Field:

 Pros

  • It is suitable for those who like practical hands-on work.
  • It is suitable for those who like to work outdoors.
  • It requires a person to work in teams and hence is suitable for those who like to work in supportive groups.

Cons

It is not suitable for those who are not willing to work for long hours as this job takes up to 40 hours per week.

Hopefully, this guide can help you as it almost covers everything that you need to know about pursuing a career as a demolition expert.

 

5 Important Construction Site Safety Procedures

5 Important Construction Site Safety Procedures

Construction site safety procedures don’t just stop after employee orientation. Maintaining safety on the job site requires frequent follow ups, inspections and training to ensure that workers are aware of crucial safety protocol and remain compliant each and every day. Here are 5 important construction site safety procedures that you need to know.

  1. Fall Protection

Employers have the duty to provide adequate fall protection for their employees. This extends to the site itself, where employers can point out any fall hazards that might exist in the facility. Safety lanyards should be put into use, preventing employees from suffering significant falls in the workplace.

In the case of fall protection, it’s important that you monitor your employees and check for any problem areas in their safety procedures. If you can see improper technique early, you can easily prevent mistakes from happening.

  1. Scaffold Safety

Scaffolds prevent unique hazards, such as the possibility of electrocution, falls, or injury due to falling debris. As a result, all employees must wear hard hats while working on, under, or around scaffolds. This simple piece of equipment can protect against potential impacts from all manner of falling debris.

It’s just as important to check for structural imperfections in the scaffold itself. It’s much better for your employees to take their time building the scaffold and prevent accidents than for them to rush the job and get hurt.

  1. Proper Ladder Use

Improper use of ladders while on a job is a leading cause of workplace injury. This can be due to a multitude of factors, such as wrong choice of ladder, improper ladder placement, attempting to carry tools while climbing a ladder, and others. Simple training on the proper use of ladders and ladder selection will quickly fix this problem.

Another aspect of ladder use that deserves attention is proper use of the steps. If a ladder advises against going above a certain step, those guidelines should be followed by your employees.

  1. Protective Equipment

Depending on the hazards of your construction site, employers may be required to provide their workers with several options when it comes to hearing protection, eye protection, and respiratory masks that can protect employees from mold and other harmful elements. Clear procedures and guidelines must be put in place and disseminated to all of your employees.

Especially in the case of mold, dust, or toxic vapors, where contaminants can cause long term illness that may take years to fully develop, it’s imperative that employees use the proper protective equipment.

  1. Hard Hat Use

When it comes to construction site safety procedures, one of the most basic has to do with the proper use of hard hats. Impact from falling debris can cause serious injury, even death.

There are plenty of technological advances when it comes to workplace safety, but something as simple as putting on a hard hat can be the difference between a fatal accident and a minor annoyance. Not only should training materials mention the importance of hard hat safety, but this should be strictly enforced as well.

Safety is Paramount 

In all aspects of the construction process, employee safety is the number one priority. It might be tempting to ignore safety and speed through a job, but this only tends to backfire in the form of workplace injury. It’s much better to do the job right the first time.

There is a variety of simple actions that you can put into place to ensure complete safety for your employees. Whether it’s in hard hat safety, proper use of ladders, or any other type of workplace safety, it’s up to you to provide clear information and instructions and strictly enforce those procedures on a daily basis. This way, you’ll have a safe workplace that’s free of the possibility of any injuries.

Author Bio:

Carolyn Clarke is a freelance writer based in Los Angeles, CA. Her writing has appeared across dozens of digital platforms, with an emphasis on workplace safety. In her free time, she takes her dog running along the Malibu coastline.

Images:

https://www.pexels.com/photo/construction-worker-safety-danger-8159/

https://pixabay.com/en/scaffold-scaffolding-construction-14253/

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:AVONDALE_SHIPYARD_WORKER_WEARS_SPECIAL_EAR_MUFFS_FOR_PROTECTION_FROM_THE_HEAVY_LEVEL_OF_INDUSTRIAL_NOISE_POLLUTION_-_NARA_-_546041.jpg

Safety Precautions to Take Before Working on Your Roof

Most of us are fortunate enough to live in areas where a variety of contractors are available for most home maintenance needs, including roof repair. But, for those who prefer to maintain a home on their own, working on the roof can be one of the more daunting maintenance challenges.

 

Before heading up that ladder, some very important precautions should be taken to avoid becoming one of the 15,500 Americans every year injured by falls. Consider incorporating the following recommendations before you head up on the roof.

Ensuring Your Ladder Is Safe

Several steps can be taken to make your ladder more secure during roof work. Ensure your ladder’s feet are on stable, level ground. If you’re working on a patio or other hard surface that may be slippery, inspect the feet of your ladder for grip. Your ladder should have serrated rubber boots on the feet that give it the grip will need.

Make sure your ladder is three rungs, or three feet, above the point at which it touches the roof. This will give you an extra bit of ladder to hold onto while you’re starting your descent. You can also tie the top of your ladder off to a roof bracket. You can purchase roof brackets that can adjust according your roof’s pitch. These brackets are easy to install into a secure point such as a rafter, and will give you a bit of added security, not to mention peace of mind.

Keep The Working Area Clear

Never climb up the ladder with tools or materials in your hand. Instead, put your materials in a five gallon bucket attached to a rope to hoist up once you are on the roof. You can continue to use the bucket to keep tools and materials contained while you are working on the roof.

Larger tools and power tools should be kept free of your immediate working space. Similar to the ladder, tying off power tools to anchor points would ensure they aren’t going anywhere. Or, by resting a 2×4 along two roof anchors you can create a ledge on which to rest your materials and power tools, avoiding the chance they’ll take a tumble.

Personal Safety

Your personal safety should be your top priority while working on the roof. Spending a little money for proper safety gear is well worth the investment. The best piece of equipment you can buy is a safety harness. Wearing a safety harness attached to a secure point of the roof will prevent you from completely falling off the roof. Though a near fall will give you a considerable scare, the safety harness will make sure you don’t fall further. Other personal safety equipment to consider is a hard hat, goggles or safety glasses, and boots with thick rubber tread for grip.

While you’re up on the roof, focus on the task at hand. Don’t let your mind wander, and don’t spend any time looking at the view. If you feel the view calling you, take a break and sit down, or wait until you are done with your work to look around at the scenery. Also, take the weather forecast into mind. You never want to work on a roof that’s wet from rain, or when a forecast for rain or wind is forecasted.

Make sure you are not working alone. You should always have a partner on the ground keeping an eye on you, anticipating any safety issues, and providing you anything you may need, so that you spend less time going up and down the ladder.

 Author’s short bio:

Frazier Roofing and Guttering is the second oldest roofing company in Grand Prairie Texas,we have over 18 years of experience in roofing and have been happily serving all of Tarrant County and surrounding cities with their gutter and roofing demands. Founded by Rich & Sheila Frazier in 1977, the year that Elvis “The King” left us. Over the years, we have built up our team of Arlington roofing contractors and have become one of the most distinguished roofing companies in the area.

Benefits of Safety Footwear when Working at Heights

Benefits of Safety Footwear when Working at Heights

 Safety at a workplace is a prerequisite at any job. Employers have to make sure that proper steps are taken to keep their workers safe, healthy and to prevent any possible injuries and accidents. Especially hazardous are maintenance and construction jobs and any such jobs where heavy machinery or working at heights is involved.

Every employee deserves to have a safe working environment, where proper precautions are in place to secure their health and where risk factors are properly and sufficiently controlled. No matter the workplace, whether it is indoors or outdoors, an office, a construction site or a factory, maximum safety has to be ensured. This involves proper safety attire which should be required by the employer. This means high visibility clothing, hats and Personal Protective Equipment or PPE.

Height risks

Working at heights is especially dangerous and involves many more risks. Accidents that result from working at heights, most commonly falls and slips, are responsible for a great number of serious injuries at a workplace every year. Anything from a two-meter fall or higher, can cause serious or even fatal injuries. Working at heights includes working on platforms, scaffolds, ladders, but also working on roofs, on any elevated structures or vehicles, on the edges of buildings or structures, working on top of pits or any kind of deeper holes.

Some of the main risks of working at heights are workers slipping, falling, and also objects falling on the people beneath them. This can happen when the workplace is not properly secured, or assessed for risks, if the objects are not properly stored or secured, if the equipment is not adequately secured, if workers are not properly trained or if they are not wearing proper safety equipment and clothing.

Importance and benefits of safety footwear

Personal Protective Equipment is essential at a workplace, and what it includes depends on the nature of the job. When it comes to working at heights, safety or protective footwear is of very high importance, but it is often times neglected or overlooked. Many problems and accidents could be prevented if proper and adequate footwear was used and worn, so ensuring that workers wear them as a part of their obligatory safety equipment is very important.

Protective footwear is designed to prevent major injuries such as falling and slipping, electrical hazards, heavy objects falling on the foot. Working at heights should involve slip-resistant shoes, i.e. with slip-resistant soles, hard materials that protect the foot from falling objects and metal protection for the toes. And on top of it all, they should also be comfortable enough to work in them for a whole day.

When it comes to the health of workers, the shoes have to be comfortable and also made in the way that they offer enough support for your feet. When standing on your feet all day and working, it can be hard on your feet as well as on your back and posture. Having a shoe that provides arch support is invaluable. It prevents health problems as well as excessive physical exhaustion, and therefore workers are more alert and there will be less falls and slips.

Having a shoe that fits properly is also very important. It is not rare that workers have problems with their legs and feet, such as pain, tension or even blisters. This can all be due to a wrongly fitted shoe, or the wrong size of it. The feet bear all the weight, especially when standing on them for a prolonged amount of time. It is important that shoes fit, so that you can safely stand and move around and be stable on your feet. It is important to measure both feet when trying on footwear, because they may not be the same size, as well as have enough room in the shoe for the toes to wiggle, leaving at least 1cm of space between them and the end of the shoe.

Quality of the soles is very important. They should be strong and flexible, but also shock-absorbent. This means that they will protect your joints when walking or hitting hard surfaces. The most important thing about them when working on heights is that the soles are slip-resistant, and those are usually made of rubber or PVC.  The entire shoe should be made out of a natural breathable material, so that the foot is kept fresh, and so that it repels water.

Article is written by Matt, a writer and editor for Choice Solutions Roofing & Exteriors.

 

 

 

Health and Safety Concerns in the US Cleaning Industry

Health and Safety Concerns in the US Cleaning Industry

 

The US Cleaning Industry is growing at a rapid pace, owing to the growth of industries such as healthcare. For instance, the employment of janitors and cleaners is expected to witness 6% growth from 2014 to 2024, a fact revealed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, US Department of Labor, in its Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2016-17 Edition, Janitors and Building Cleaners.

 

Working in the cleaning industry can be a physically demanding task, especially while working outdoors, such as cleaning windows of high-rise buildings. Here’s a review some of the key health and safety concerns and what the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recommends to address these issues.

Safety and Heath Related Tips for the Cleaning Industry

  • Personal Protective Equipment – OSHA recommends that all equipment for personal protection be safely designed and constructed. These must meet or be equivalent to the standards developed by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The guidelines recommend the equipment fit comfortably, something that can mean the difference between “safely covered” or “dangerously exposed.”

 

  • Safe Work Practices When Using Chemicals – As per OSHA, it is the responsibility of the employer to train workers on safe practices while handling cleaning chemicals. Gloves act as good personal protective gear while dealing with chemicals. Natural latex gloves are recommended by experts at Signature Restaurant Supply, even while taking on messy cooking chores or at the time of cleaning and washing dishes.

 

  • Preventing Falls – One of the leading causes of work-related injuries and deaths is falls. Employers in the cleaning industry must provision for equipment like safety harnesses and safety nets. Another step that can be taken to prevent falls is to keep the floors in the work areas clean and dry at all times.

 

  • Protection Against Respiratory Issues – The use of respirators protects workers against work environments where there is lot of dust, smoke, vapors and allergens in the air. A respirator will either work by providing clean air from an external source or by filtering particles and chemically purifying the air. Some of these apparatuses such as a Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) and Powered Air-Purifying Respirator (PAPR) might require special training on how to use it safely.

 

  • Ergonomics – A good work place manager will always focus on the ergonomics aspect of the cleaning process. There are many concern areas for a cleaning worker, from moving furniture to carrying buckets and many things in between. For instance, the more tools and supplies that are loaded on a cart or a barrel, the greater the amount of force needed to push it.

 

  • Confined Spaces – Several areas, given the fact that they aren’t designed for humans, are termed as “confined spaces” and are occupational work hazards if adequate safety precautions are not taken. For someone in the cleaning industry, such areas could include tanks, vessels, pits, manholes, tunnels, large storage bins, etc. For instance, a blocked leachate line in a composting toilet, where liquid waste is backing into the waste vault, will be termed as an example of a “confined space” hazard for someone in the cleaning industry, according to The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) guidelines.

 

  • Electrical Safety – For an all-important issue of electrical safety, OSHA recommends never to operate electrical equipment while you are standing in water. Only a qualified and authorized person must inspect the electrical wires. Fallen electrical lines must not, therefore, be handled by janitors and cleaners, and must be reported to the utility company.

 

Well, the guidelines are out there to be followed. It is the primary responsibility of the employers in the cleaning industry to ensure compliance and provide a safe and healthy working environment for their workers.

Construction Safety 101: Workwear, Safety Gear & Equipment

Construction Safety 101: Workwear, Safety Gear & Equipment

Keeping construction workers safe is a primary job among managers and foremen, with accomplishing the work to specifics and being on time being second. To support this main concern on construction sites, there are different pieces of safety vests and equipment that every worker should wear. These include items like safety vests, reflective T-shirts, and hard hats. Let’s walk through construction safety 101 while keeping your team sharp and safe on the construction site with these safety items.

Hard Hats

Protect the head in safety and style with an OSHA approved hard hat.  Hard hats should provide not just maximum protection from falling debris, but they should also deliver comfort factor for its wearer. For instance, if you need a high-performing hard hat with a Super-bowl style design, 2017 Super Bowl hard hats are approved for constructions site. These NFL hard hats are designed with comfortable and adjustable 4-point One-Touch Suspension for maximum protection and comfort.

Back Support Gears

Back injuries are among the most pressing health problems in construction sites by far. Hence, workers should promote maximum construction safety 101 by using back support gears to stay sharp and safe on the site.  The Allegro All Fit Back Support items are made in a universal size, so they fit most workers. Protect your back with these high-performance belts that deliver full back coverage, with neoprene pads for comfortable wear. For workers’ convenience, these back support gears come inside of a customized reusable zipper storage bag.

High Visibility Vests

Most construction workers require maximum flame resistance and maximum visibility at work. The Arc Flame Resistant Lime Class 2 Sleeveless Vest – Silver Stripe is preferred by many workers due to its wide range of applications. These High-Visibility vests come with silver stripes for excellent visibility as well as flame resistance. There are available in different sizes, so every worker will surely find the perfect size for him to work smartly and safely at the construction site.  They are also soft and flexible for maximum convenience.

Fall Protection

One of the most serious concerns among construction workers is falling. It is every employer’s responsibility to protect their employees from falls.  The Elk River Freedom Series Aerial Lift Kit is an OSHA-approved item that contains several fall protection products. If you work with platform lifts, buck trucks or scissor lifts, this item is a great product for you. They come with a unique D-ring harness for comfort and security while working high above the ground.

Safety Respirators

Protect your workers from gases, vapors and particles with high-performing reusable respirators. They

 

Provide protection against particles, gases and vapors with the 3M full line of reusable respirators. The 3M 5000 Half Face Respirator Kits are made to fit bigger head sizes. These safety respirators are very easy to set up and they can be used for wide range of applications.

Aside from these safety items, construction workers are also required to wear sturdy work shoes, long work pants, safety glasses, chemical splash goggles, face shields, hearing protection and protective gloves. At all times, practice construction safety 101 to keep your team safe and sharp at work.

 

Author Bio (Northbay)

Northbay is known for its high quality HVAC products and services that every client can depend on. They are proud to sell and install the finest air conditioning and heating products and carry out quality services for repair and maintenance. They can help you with all your HVAC needs, regardless of your system’s makes and models. They pride themselves for their unmatched customer service. http://www.northbayheatingandair.com/

 

 

Safety Tips for Workers Involved in High-Risk Jobs

Safety Tips for Workers Involved in High-Risk Jobs

Some people choose to work in a nice, safe office all day. Others choose a more dangerous line of work. If you are planning to work a high risk, dangerous job, you should follow proper safety tips. If you protect yourself on the job, you will be less likely to be in an accident that could cause injuries or even death.

Never Do a Job that You Aren’t Trained For

If you are considering working a high-risk job, you need to be properly trained and qualified. If you take up a job that you are not trained for, not only are you putting yourself in harms way, you are also putting your co-workers and the people around you in harms way as well.

Wear the Required Uniform

The reason that employers require you to wear a uniform is not so that you look silly, it is so that you remain protected. For example, if you are working in a factory or as a mechanic, you might be required to wear Dickies overalls to protect you from a burn or a chemical spill. Many kitchen jobs require you to wear non-slip shoes. This is to prevent a slip and fall accident on the job. If you are wearing the required uniform, you will be less likely to be injured.

Use Proper Safety Equipment

Certain jobs require that you use proper safety equipment in order to be safe on the job. For example, goggles should be worn by a chemist or a welder to prevent injury to the eyes. Construction workers should wear a hard hat to prevent a head injury on the job. While a doctor is not considered a dangerous job, safety precautions are taken there as well by wearing gloves. If your employer requires that you wear safety equipment, you should listen.

Fall Prevention

If you are working a job that takes you to great heights, such as repairing or installing a roof, you should make sure that you are using the proper safety equipment for fall prevention. First, you should make sure that you are attached to a safety harness at all time such that even if you lose your footing, you don’t fall off the roof. Also, if the roof is very high, you should consider using scaffolding. It will help you reach the heights that you need, safely. Finally, you should always wear a hard hat on the job to prevent a head injury if you were to fall or if something were to fall on you.

Listen and Participate in Safety Seminars

Employers who hire people to work dangerous jobs will often hold seminars to be sure that their employees are safe while they work. To ensure employees’ safety, you should partake in and listen during safety seminars. The more information that you have on being safe while working, the less chance there will be for injuries.

Always Be Alert on the Job

It is a good idea to be alert at any job, however, it is even more important to be alert if you are working a dangerous job. When you are alert, you will be able to recognize that an accident is about to happen, and you can get out of harms way before it is too late.

Some people choose a dangerous job because these jobs pay well. Others choose dangerous jobs simply because it is the line of work that they are interested in. Whatever the reason that you have chosen a high-risk job, you need to take the proper precautions so that you can be sure that you are safe on the job.

Man On Ladder

10 of the Most Common Workplace Accidents and Injuries

You probably already know that health and safety legislation is a favorite punching bag for a certain type of newspaper columnist, but what you might not be aware of is that there are hundreds of thousands of accidents – many of them serious – in workplaces every year. That’s why it’s so important to take the proper precautions at work.

Of course, even the best prepared among us can still fall victim to accidents at work – but to be forewarned is to be forearmed, as the saying goes. Here, in no particular order, are ten of the most common accidents and injuries in the workplace.

1. Fights at work: These aren’t quite as rare as we might like to think. Simmering workplace tensions can bubble under for months or even years before spilling over into physical confrontation, or alternatively one workmate can take another’s opinion on last weekend’s football the wrong way. Fights in the workplace can, unsurprisingly, result in nasty injuries. Effective procedures for dealing with employee grievances can help reduce the risk of them coming to blows, though.

2. Walking into objects: It’s probably safe to say we’ve all done this at some point. Maybe you’re chatting absent-mindedly or maybe you’re feeling a little under the weather, when you suddenly find yourself on the sharp end of a door, table, wall or cabinet. Needless to say, these injuries can sting a bit. Luckily, many such accidents can be avoided by reminding employees to be vigilant and putting unnecessary hazards out of the way where people won’t walk into them.

3. Slips, trips and falls: Whatever your particular work setting is – whether you work in a shop, a factory or an office – you’re likely to encounter slippery surfaces at some point, so it’s not a totally remote possibility that you might come a cropper on one. Another big risk for many is falling while working at height; falls from ladders are most common, but falls from scaffolding and other platforms can also be dangerous.

4. 2. Muscle strains: Strained muscles are another commonplace work-related injury, as anyone who regularly lifts heavy items at work will probably know already. Back and neck strains, in particular, are all too frequently sustained while working. These injuries can be avoided easily – some basic training on proper lifting techniques can make a big difference.

3. Exposure to loud noise: You might think that industrial deafness is a thing of the past and went out with all those old heavy industries, but that’s not the case – not least because many industrial workers continue to be exposed to loud noises while at work. Industrial deafness can also result in major compensation payouts further along the line, so it’s very much in employers’ interest to nip this particular problem in the bud. Safety measures such as ear protection can do much to prevent it.

5. Being hit by falling objects: Plenty of workers find themselves on the receiving end of falling objects – and what’s more, this isn’t just a problem in warehouse-type environments. Objects which fall from shelves or out of cupboards can cause some nasty injuries, particularly if the individual who ends up feeling the full force doesn’t see it coming. Providing adequate storage cages and reminding employees of how to store items safely can go a long way to reducing this risk.

6. Crashes and collisions: Accidents resulting in crash or impact injuries are also quite frequent at work. Whether they involve cars, lorries or even smaller vehicles such as forklift trucks, they can have seriously nasty consequences. It’s therefore up to employers to ensure that seatbelts and other safety precautions are both in place and in use where appropriate.

7. Repetitive strain injury: RSI is another problem that’s become increasingly commonplace at work over the years, though even now some employers don’t seem to take it entirely seriously. It’s not just a problem for those of us who regularly use keyboards in our work, either – in fact, it can result from any repetitive motion of the joints. The cumulative impact of RSI can be severe in some cases, so it makes sense to take precautions. Employers can help prevent RSI by encouraging and reminding workers to take appropriate breaks. Likewise, ergonomic equipment, like hand trucks can help to alleviate the strain.

8. Cuts and lacerations: All sorts of office implements can end up leaving their user nursing a painful cut. From power saws to paper trimmers, it’s easy to do yourself a mischief at work. The most common causes of these lacerations include poor training, inadequate safety procedures and failing to wear the proper protection. Bosses can help prevent such accidents by providing adequate safety equipment and putting the right procedures (including training) in place.

9. Inhaling toxic fumes: While most of us don’t work with hazardous chemicals, those of us who do may be at risk of skin or eye reactions as well as potentially more serious injuries when exposed to them without protection. Protective equipment such as safety goggles is indispensable in these situations, so employers must be sure to provide workers with the gear they need to avoid dangerous exposure.

10. Exposure to loud noise: You might think that industrial deafness is a thing of the past and went out with all those old heavy industries, but that’s not the case – not least because many industrial workers continue to be exposed to loud noises while at work. Industrial deafness can also result in major compensation payouts further along the line, so it’s very much in employers’ interest to nip this particular problem in the bud. Safety measures such as ear protection can do much to prevent it.

Although there’s no shortage of ways people can injure themselves at work, as we’ve already noted there are various things employers can do to prevent their employees from coming to any avoidable harm. Good training, clear signage and access to the necessary safety equipment can all be a big help. Regular risk assessments are also a very good idea. You can’t always legislate for sheer absent-mindedness, but you can at least avoid a lot of unnecessary mishaps.

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Electrical Safety Tips

There are many electrical appliances that are often used in everyday life or during construction efforts, so you will need to ensure you’re treating such electrical works with the respect and care they deserve so you can be safe from harm. Take your time to check the principles of safe operation of electrical devices ahead and make sure everyone both around your home and at your workplace or construction site is fully aware of them at all costs, as electricity is one force that should never be underestimated due to its lethal hazard and long-lasting effects on the human body after an accident. The following tips will give you more information you can use to deal with it:

Electrical Safety Tips

• If you want to be safe when using electrical appliances, light bulbs and other types of equipment, then you will need to be vigilant at all times to avoid burns, shocks and the threat of electrocution. Once again: keep your eyes open and be careful.

• You would do well to assume that all overhead wires are charged with lethal voltage, as well as any exposed wiring you see either around your home, office or other location such as a construction site. Avoid touching exposed wiring at all costs and use proper protection to stay safe, such as insulated gloves at the least with lower voltage wiring. Leave power lines to professional electricians and the company that employs them and stay away from them – a simple, common sense solution.

• You would do well to stay at least 10 feet away from any possible overhead wires during cleanup activities. If you’re working at certain heights or you need to handle longer objects, you would still do well to survey the place before you move on to working with overhead wires.

• If any overhead wires happen to fall on a vehicle, you should stay inside and drive away if possible. If your engine stalls you should stay inside and call the local electric company for assistance with this issue, as well as emergency services instead of trying to solve the problem yourself.

• You should never try to do any operations with electrical equipment while still standing in water. You should also do your best to avoid repairing any electrical cords or any equipment unless you happen to be authorized and qualified to do so. If you do need to do any repairs, you would do well to have a qualified electrician doing them instead of you, as they will have the necessary experience to do so.

Electrical Safety Tips2

• When you’re working in damp or wet locations, you need to ensure you have all electric cords and equipment fixed and in good condition, as well as using a ground fault circuit interrupter to keep them safe. Keep your eyes open when you’re doing any cleaning, especially during floor cleaning, carpet cleaning, upholstery cleaning and so forth. A short circuit can become a fire hazard quickly if left alone, so if you smell the acrid smell of burning insulation, shut the power off and locate the issue before moving forward.

• Last, but not least: always be cautious when you work with electricity, no matter where you are and what you’re doing. It may seem like a simple thing to keep in mind but you should never feel safe just because you think you have things covered. Be vigilant, be safe.
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