Category Archives: Protective Clothing

Construction Safety 101: Workwear, Safety Gear & Equipment

Construction Safety 101: Workwear, Safety Gear & Equipment

Keeping construction workers safe is a primary job among managers and foremen, with accomplishing the work to specifics and being on time being second. To support this main concern on construction sites, there are different pieces of safety vests and equipment that every worker should wear. These include items like safety vests, reflective T-shirts, and hard hats. Let’s walk through construction safety 101 while keeping your team sharp and safe on the construction site with these safety items.

Hard Hats

Protect the head in safety and style with an OSHA approved hard hat.  Hard hats should provide not just maximum protection from falling debris, but they should also deliver comfort factor for its wearer. For instance, if you need a high-performing hard hat with a Super-bowl style design, 2017 Super Bowl hard hats are approved for constructions site. These NFL hard hats are designed with comfortable and adjustable 4-point One-Touch Suspension for maximum protection and comfort.

Back Support Gears

Back injuries are among the most pressing health problems in construction sites by far. Hence, workers should promote maximum construction safety 101 by using back support gears to stay sharp and safe on the site.  The Allegro All Fit Back Support items are made in a universal size, so they fit most workers. Protect your back with these high-performance belts that deliver full back coverage, with neoprene pads for comfortable wear. For workers’ convenience, these back support gears come inside of a customized reusable zipper storage bag.

High Visibility Vests

Most construction workers require maximum flame resistance and maximum visibility at work. The Arc Flame Resistant Lime Class 2 Sleeveless Vest – Silver Stripe is preferred by many workers due to its wide range of applications. These High-Visibility vests come with silver stripes for excellent visibility as well as flame resistance. There are available in different sizes, so every worker will surely find the perfect size for him to work smartly and safely at the construction site.  They are also soft and flexible for maximum convenience.

Fall Protection

One of the most serious concerns among construction workers is falling. It is every employer’s responsibility to protect their employees from falls.  The Elk River Freedom Series Aerial Lift Kit is an OSHA-approved item that contains several fall protection products. If you work with platform lifts, buck trucks or scissor lifts, this item is a great product for you. They come with a unique D-ring harness for comfort and security while working high above the ground.

Safety Respirators

Protect your workers from gases, vapors and particles with high-performing reusable respirators. They

 

Provide protection against particles, gases and vapors with the 3M full line of reusable respirators. The 3M 5000 Half Face Respirator Kits are made to fit bigger head sizes. These safety respirators are very easy to set up and they can be used for wide range of applications.

Aside from these safety items, construction workers are also required to wear sturdy work shoes, long work pants, safety glasses, chemical splash goggles, face shields, hearing protection and protective gloves. At all times, practice construction safety 101 to keep your team safe and sharp at work.

 

Author Bio (Northbay)

Northbay is known for its high quality HVAC products and services that every client can depend on. They are proud to sell and install the finest air conditioning and heating products and carry out quality services for repair and maintenance. They can help you with all your HVAC needs, regardless of your system’s makes and models. They pride themselves for their unmatched customer service. http://www.northbayheatingandair.com/

 

 

6 Must-Have HVAC Health & Safety Products

6 Must-Have HVAC Health & Safety Products

HVAC Health & Safety Products are optimally matched so you can benefit not only from efficient installation and reduce operational costs, but also form an additional layer of security against system failure. Today let’s walk through a rundown of top HVAC products that are perfect for your air heating and cooling needs.

  1. HVAC Safety Glasses

Protect yourself by picking HVAC safety glasses that comply with the latest industry standard. For instance, Jackson Nemesis CAMO Safety Glasses w/ Amber Lens is a useful HVAC safety product for a vast range of applications. They come with a unique camouflage design and several types of lens tints to make HVAC works easier and safer.

  1. Multi-Task Light Gloves

Eliminate the fatigue and the risks of hand injury while working on HVAC systems. Invest in a high quality safety glove that that provides high levelsb of illumination for any task. You’d surely love the efficiency of MCR RED Multi Task Light Gloves made with sophisticated finger construction that delivers high-intensity LED lights. They are designed from synthetic leather and can be utilized for different kinds of tasks.

  1. Safety Vests

All HVAC workers should use a high-visibility safety vest. When looking for a safety vest, you should always look into the background colors of your working area, so you won’t blend into it. For example, if you’re working on a blacktop with white safety cones, you might want to choose a high-visibility safety vest like Orange Surveyors Vests with THINK SAFETY Imprint on Back.

  1. Hard Hats

One of the most important HVAC Health & Safety Products is hard hats. They protect the head from potential injuries due to falling objects, electric shock or impact with debris. Experts recommend HVAC safety hard hats that are designed from a protective polyethylene shell such as MSA V-Gard Cap Style Hard Hats with One Touch Suspensions. They are designed for superior impact and puncture resistance.

  1. Safety Coverall

Safety coveralls for HVAC works should be comfortable, functional and provide the necessary safety level of contractors. It’s a smart ideal to invest in high quality HVAC clothing such as Indura Flame Resistant Coverall. It weighs only 9 ounces and is designed with a unique Khaki color style. Theses safety clothings provide optimum flame resistance. Thanks to its flame-retardant polymer.

  1. Hearing Protection Products

HVAC Health & Safety Products for hearing protection including earplugs are designed for workers who work in noisy settings. These safety products are important not only to protect your hearing from loud noise but also for your safety. Purchase a high-performing hearing protection product like Howard Leight USA Earplugs Uncorded. These earplugs have patriotic colors that also help increase visibility. They easily adapt to your ear canal’s shape and they are very comfortable to wear.

In a working environment where health and safety are very crucial, it is important to choose the right tools and apparels. To those who work in the HVAC industry, the above-mentioned HVAC Health & Safety Products are all you need to keep HVAC jobs much easier, more convenient, and safer.

 

Author Bio (Withrow Mechanical Inc)

Withrow Mechanical Inc is a highly dependable HVAC company that specializes in residential and commercial heating and cooling solutions. The company aims to provide customers with top quality products and services that are unique to every situation. While doing this, they strive to keep all HVAC projects on time and within the budget of their customers. Committed to customers’ complete satisfaction, Withrow Mechanical Inc. stands behind all of their workmanship for the best HVAC solutions. http://withrowmechanical.com

 

 

 

 

Safety Precautions to Take When Working with Electronic Equipment

Safety Precautions to Take When Working with Electronic Equipment

   

Safety Can be Confusing
Safety Can be Confusing

 

When working with or testing any electronic equipment, it’s always important to be cautious. Whatever type of equipment you’re handling, whether simple or complex, it’s important to take the right safety precautions.  

Working with electricity comes with huge risks that should never be taken lightly. If you’re a hobbyist who loves working with electronic components or an electronics professional at your workplace, safety should always come first.

 To avoid personal injury, possible damage to equipment or danger of fire, all work on electronic equipment should be conducted following these safety procedures.

 General Safety

 Before working on any electronics, consider following these basic safety precautions to help reduce any hazards.

           Remove any electronic equipment you’re testing or working on from the power source.

           Never assume the power circuit is off. Test and test again with a voltmeter to confirm.

           Remove fuses and replace them only after the power to the circuit is disconnected.

           Don’t connect power to a circuit until you’re done working on it and rechecked the work.

           Always ensure that all electronics equipment is properly grounded

            If it’s damaged, replace it. For instance, replace cables instead of repairing with insulating tape.

            Always use the right electronics repair and maintenance tools.

            Always return covers after removing them to reduce the risk of electric shock. 

           Make sure your circuit is not overloaded.

            Always have safety equipment like a fire extinguisher, a basic first aid kit and a mobile phone nearby.

 Personal Safety

 It’s important to ensure that you’re safe when working on electronic circuits. Here are some personal safety precautions to keep in mind: 

           Always keep your work area dry.  

           Always work in a well-ventilated area. 

           Don’t wear flapping or loose clothing when working. 

           Don’t work with metallic jewelry on your hands like watches, rings and bracelets.  

           Don’t use bare hands to remove hot parts. 

           Always wear non-conductive shoes. 

           Always wear insulator gloves in your hands when carrying out repairs. 

           When removing high-voltage charges on capacitors, always use a shorting stick. 

           Don’t hold the test prods when measuring voltage over 300V. 

           Always remove power to a circuit before connecting alligator clips. 

           Always wear safety goggles.  

           Be careful when handling large capacitors as they can still hold high voltage even after you’ve disconnected the circuit from power.

 High Voltage Safety

 One mistake that electronics experts make when doing repairs or maintenance work is assuming routine safety procedures after getting all too familiar with their work. It’s important to know that most electronic equipment use high-voltage that is dangerous and can be fatal. Always follow these safety precautions when working on or near high-voltage circuits.

            Don’t work on electronic equipment or make repairs with high voltage on. 

           Don’t take chances doing what you’re not sure about. 

           Consider using an isolation transformer when working on AC powered electronic circuits or equipment. 

           Never tamper with interlocks. 

           Don’t ground yourself: Make it a practice to use only one hand when connecting equipment to an electronic circuit.   

 

HighVoltagePowerSupply

Fire Safety Precautions 

When working with electronic equipment, there is often a risk of fire caused by a short circuit or other reason. Follow these precautionary steps: 

           Avoid anything that would cause a fire around your working area like paper, cloth or other combustible materials. 

           Look out for damaged wire insulation, overheating of electronic equipment, damaged circuit boards and corrosive components like batteries.  

           If there is a burning smell on your electronic equipment, disconnect the power source. 

           If there is a fire, use a nonconducting dry powder or CO2 fire extinguisher.  

           Always check your circuit to be sure that everything is okay after repairs or maintenance before connecting power.  

Electric Shock

 One of the major hazards when working with electronic equipment is electric shock. To avoid this, you should take a few safety precautions, including: 

           Always read safety procedures that come with every electronic equipment you’re about to test or work on.  

           Recheck all wires for bad connections

            Always make sure that all parts of electronic equipment are well-mounted to prevent accidents.  

           Keep electronic equipment away from water and other liquids 

           Always check for signs of wear, defects and fraying on electronic equipment cables, cords and connectors.  

           Use special safety rubber gloves and shoes. 

Testing Equipment 

With the increasing use of electronics in homes and workplaces, safety is becoming more and more important to consumers and service experts. If you’re an electronics expert offering repair and maintenance services, it’s important to invest in the right new or used testing equipment for your work—that ensures that you’re able to carry out your job safely.

 

 

Author Bio:

Arnold Sharpe is a freelance writer and an electronics expert working with the leading electronic testing equipment store in Los Angeles, CA. He reviews the latest home and office electronic equipment in the market.

 

Image 1: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f8/Soldering_a_0805.jpg

Image 2: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/94/HighVoltagePowerSupply.jpg

Be Aware and Prepare to stop spread of Zika virus.

As Congress haggles over how many millions or billions of dollars to spend to help stop the spread of the Zika virus in the U.S. before summer, researchers at New Mexico State University are already testing wearable mosquito repellent devices to determine which ones can best help us protect ourselves against these insects.

“The goal is to find out what works and what doesn’t,” said Immo Hansen, an NMSU associate professor of biology involved in the investigation. “There are so many products on the market that simply don’t work, so I think it’s really important to test them in a scientific way.”

This month, a group from Hansen’s Molecular Vector Physiology Lab, in the College of Arts and Sciences, began a series of tests to determine the effectiveness of a dozen commercially available wearable repellents, including clip-ons and wristbands. Though the study is ongoing, preliminary data revealed that citronella-based bracelets and wristbands have little effect on mosquitoes, whereas OFF Clip-On devices not only repel mosquitoes, they also kill them.

“Some people are really resistant to putting repellents on their skin, so they would rather choose a wearable device,” said Stacy Rodriguez, manager of NMSU’s Molecular Vector Physiology Lab and lead researcher on this project. “Right now, we are just trying to see if the wearable devices are as effective as the spray-on devices.”

The group plans to publish the results of this research by mid-summer.

This analysis is a follow-up to a study the group conducted last fall on 10 commercially available spray-on repellents. During this experiment, Rodriguez and her colleagues recognized the most reliable sprays as DEET products and lemon eucalyptus-based insect repellents.

For the current study, the group is testing the wearable devices using a 70-foot wind tunnel located in an NMSU research facility. After taking baseline readings, the researchers put on the repellent devices and position themselves upwind of a series of test cages. Depending on the product’s repellency, the caged mosquitoes either fly away from the test subjects or toward them.

The wearable devices are being tested against the same two species of mosquito used in the spray repellent study: the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) and the yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti), both of which carry the Zika virus.

“These two mosquitoes have very different levels of attraction to even one certain individual,” Rodriguez said. “Since attraction varies, repellency is also going to vary, so it’s important to test multiple species when you’re looking at repellents and their efficacy.”

Thanks to body chemistry, mosquitoes are also more inclined to bite someone who “smells” good to them.

“Everybody has a different bacterial flora on his or her skin,” Hansen said. “The bacteria break down components of sweat and produce a different set of olfactory clues for the mosquitoes. Some people just smell better to mosquitoes than others, and there’s really nothing you can do about that except wear repellents. There’s nothing you can do to change the bacterial flora on your skin.”

Consequently, these chemical differences can impact which repellents work best for you.

“Something that might work for one person because of his or her body chemistry, might not work for somebody else because he or she has different chemistry,” Rodriguez said.

While the Asian tiger mosquito hasn’t established significant populations in New Mexico, Aedes aegypti – one of the primary vectors of dengue, Zika virus and yellow fever – can be found in your backyard in Las Cruces.

“Be aware; prepare,” Hansen said. “Get yourself a good repellent, wear long sleeves, long pants. Try to avoid getting bit.”

The mosquito that carries the Zika virus can breed in as little as one centimeter of standing water, Hansen explained. For those with ponds, his recommendation was to get Gambusia, or mosquito fish, from the Doña Ana County Vector Control to keep backyard mosquito populations at bay.

Next fall, Hansen and Rodriguez plan to investigate mosquito attractants for use in baits. Surprisingly, even though humans attract mosquitoes all the time, Rodriguez explained that creating a chemical to attract mosquitoes is actually harder than repelling them.

“We have such complex odors that it’s actually hard to emulate that in cream or a bait trap,” she said. “It’s actually much more complex than creating something that disguises your human smell.”

Article Provided by…

Molecular Vector Physiology Laboratory
New Mexico State University
Immo Hansen, biology professor
immoh@nmsu.edu (575) 646-7719

3 tips for handling power lines after bad weather

Tornadoes have caused damage in multiple states across the country this year. As the Insurance Journal reports, Arkansas saw several possible tornadoes appear on March 13, with thousands of power outages lasting on into the next day. Illinois experienced a possible tornado the same week, and similar storms may have been spotted in Iowa as well. This last storm brought funnel clouds around the Quad Cities, as WQAD8 reported.

With all of this activity, companies are likely considering the implications of sending crews to respond to tornado damage. Power outages in particular can add to worker risk, since they could result from fallen lines that need to be carefully restored. Dealing with the cables safely can force crew members to rely on their protective clothing as well as any training or best practices they have.

The storm may have passed, but workers could still be facing some urgent dangers. Here are three tips to help crew stay safe while they do their job. In some cases, these are not only good pieces of advice but recommended by government agencies.

#1: Choose the right footwear
Before arriving at the site, workers can ask themselves whether or not they are ready to step out on potentially dangerous ground. After a tornado, simply walking from one spot to another can leave a crew member exposed to sharp edges. Foot protection should match the guidelines set out by the Occupational Safety & Health Administration, which listed foot and leg protection in its Personal Protective Equipment booklet.

Footwear is also important around the electrical source itself. The same booklet examined two types of shoes that can provide protection against electrical current: conductive shoes and electrical hazard, safety toe shoes. The latter “can protect against open circuits of up to 600 volts in dry conditions and should be used in conjunction with other insulating equipment and additional precautions to reduce the risk of a worker becoming a path for hazardous electrical energy.”

#2: Err on the side of caution
A separate fact sheet from OSHA also specifically addresses the dangers of working around fallen cables. The source noted how difficult it is to determine whether or not a cable is “on.” Instead, it recommended that workers should assume all cables they see are energized, which means avoiding any contact, even from inside a vehicle. Anything touching a downed wire is potentially dangerous.

Wearing sufficient hand protection, such as insulating rubber gloves, may let crews stay consistent with the other protective gear they’re wearing. It also helps to be mindful of overhead lines: the OSHA Contact With Power Lines etool advised staying ten feet away from these lines. Warning signs should clearly alert all crew to wires that aren’t very apparent.

#3: Keep a safe distance
A wire lying on the ground could seem harmless enough while the area around it provides the real trap. The same booklet states that some large objects, including buildings and fences, can carry current. The ground itself may also pose a hazard, as “electricity can spread outward through the ground in a circular shape” starting at the edge of the wire.

As an extra precaution, crews need to make sure none of their additional equipment will conduct a charge. Relying on material that doesn’t conduct electricity at all makes this less of a likelihood: One example could be a ladder that isn’t made of metal. Keeping lines grounded or insulated also gives crews possible protection and reduced danger levels at the worksite.

Contact Texas America Safety Company for more information on protective gear. Stay ready for anything in the stormy season and keep your workers safe.

Cleaning is Essential Part of Work Safety

Even the safest-looking workplaces have their own dangerous moments. If you think that nothing wrong could possibly come to you in the safety of your own calm office, think again. There are probably bookshelves near you, with books high above you that could fall off and concuss you. How are the power outlets handled? Are there any bare wires? If you are working in a paper-filled office, even the smallest sparks can lead to big fires if not handled immediately. And, believe it or not, all these dangers are doubled when you opt to do some cleaning around the office. Here are some tips on how to protect yourself and the office.

• If you are about to do some office cleaning, use gloves. Hand protection is important even in the smallest of instances. Rubber gloves can save you a nasty shock and spill if you accidentally come in contact with a bare wire. They will also protect your hands from all the toxins in the cleaning product you are using. Avoid gross rashes and itchy spots with ease, simply put on a pair of gloves while rubbing your desk with a cleaner product and all will be fine.

Cleaning is Essential Part of Work Safety

• If might seem laughable, but if you are working in a place with lots of shelves with files or books, and you are trying to dust them, or even just looking for a particular item, you should use some headgear. Imagine you inadvertently shake a bookcase as you are browsing through some volumes, and there are heavy and unchecked books or folders above you. One wrong step (or shake) will collapse a few of those volumes over your head and could easily lead to a bad concussion.

• Be wary of slippery spots on your floor or carpet. If you are one to have lunches in the office, surely you spilled something once or twice, but did not bother to thoroughly clean it. Some stains become slippery over time and you should protect yourself – and the ones coming into your office from them. Get some carpet cleaners to remove it, or even hire a cleaning agency to do regular office cleaning and keep your workplace safe. Yes, cleanliness sometimes is the key to safety. A professional cleaner will do a fine job of recognizing lasting and problematic stains and will remove them to bring the shine to your office.

• If you are working with a lot of office hardware, you should know that it is inevitable that something may eventually breakdown. Unless you are a mechanic or specialize in office appliance repairs, call an actual repairman to see to the problem. Do not be a hero and try to help out a colleague with a quick fix to a problem that you have no clue about. Leave the broken machinery as they are and call somebody who actually can fix them.

Cleaning is Essential Part of Work Safety2

It requires very little to work safely in your office. A small bit of effort put into a clean and organized office will do wonders for the state of your workplace. If you cannot do it yourself, get a cleaning company. The key thing here is to work safe, so expenses should not be an obstacle.
Read more basic cleaning tips on: finchleycarpetcleaners.org.uk

Protection Clothing for Cleaning

Cleaning is a necessary task that you are often times forced to do around your home and your office. Thanks to cleaning, you will have a refreshed environment and living conditions that are more than suitable for resting and relaxing. There are a lot of products and tools that can make your cleaning more effective and fast, but what you have to keep in mind is that home cleaning and office cleaning should be carefully executed.
If you want to be completely safe during your cleaning service, you need to consider some protection clothing. There is a lot of risk related to using the various cleaning solutions, some of which are far from safe. If you pay attention to labels, you will often notice the description saying ‘poison’, ‘toxic’ and ‘danger’. That alone should be enough to warn you of the threats and make you stay alert during your cleaning service. Acquire the following gear if you want to be safe:

Gloves – even simple latex gloves can protect your skin from the chemicals and dangerous ingredients of various solutions you use in your everyday cleaning. If you have any skin problem, such as irritation, rash, itch and burn you will do well to avoid direct contact with the solutions you use in office and home cleaning. Gloves will not hinder your cleaning in any way, and they will not allow the dangerous liquid to come into contact with the skin on your hands. Thanks to a pair of gloves you can mix solutions without fear and wash dishes with any type of cleaning detergent.

Protection Clothing for Cleaning2

Goggles – some of the cleaning products you use during your cleaning service can greatly irritate your eyes because of the fumes they release. In order to protect yourself from this danger, you should acquire a pair of specialized goggles to wear while cleaning. This will provide protection for your sight not only from the fumes of the chemicals, but also from dust and other debris that might get airborne during carpet cleaning for example. Goggles can usually be used multiple times, so definitely consider acquiring quality protection for your sight.

Mask – cleaning solutions and more importantly the chemicals that are present inside them can sometimes lead to respiratory distress. To avoid breathing in the chemicals and fumes of the cleaning products you use during your cleaning service, you should always wear a mask. It will be your best line of defense when it comes to filtering the toxins of the cleaning products. This is especially the case with professional cleaners, who have to work with different cleaning solutions every single day. A mask will also prevent solid particles, such as dust and various others from entering your organism.

Protection Clothing for Cleaning

Apronaprons are very useful, especially those that provide pockets where you can put your extra cleaning equipment during your home cleaning. Not only will you stay clean if the job is a messy one, but also you will have everything you need with you and will not waste time.
A lot of these additions to your cleaning are not expensive at all and you can use most of them more than once. Definitely consider them to be safe during your cleaning.

More cleaning tips and advises find at: reliable carpet cleaning in Clapham

Taking Preemptive Measures for Vehicle Accidents in Construction (Guest Post)

Since reducing the risk of fatal accidents and death rate within the construction industry is not an easy job, taking timely, effective preemptive measures is the only way out. Read further for a fair idea of what can be done and how!

The rate of accidents, injuries and deaths associated with the construction industry is much higher than most other areas of work. The most common reasons that make construction work perilous is possibility of deadly accidents with vehicles and falls from extreme height.

On an average, every third fatal accident at a construction site has one or more vehicles involved. Frequently occurring transport accidents at work include:

  1. Victims being stuck by moving vehicles, especially while reversing
  2. People falling from vehicles or hit by things falling from vehicles
  3. Overturning vehicles leading to serious injuries

What Can Be Done to Prevent Vehicle Accidents in Construction?

The first step towards reducing high death rate in construction industry is to reduce the risk of fatal accidents at construction sites that involve vehicles. Employers need to fulfill their legal duties and play a pivotal role in that case, especially by assessing risks and taking practical measures to ensure the safety of everyone around.

This may include maintaining accident records, training and consulting employees, and co-coordinating and cooperating contractors. The focus needs to be on planning and implementing collective safety measures, instead of giving individual measures extra importance. The basic idea should be to replace the hazardous with the harmless.

Taking Preemptive Measures for Vehicle Accidents in the Construction Industry

Practically, accident prevention should not start after the work has already begun on the construction site. Instead, designers, architects and planners can considerably diminish the risk of vehicle accidents by designing and planning well in the pre-build phase.

Risk assessment is the most important aspect that every employer ought to take care of, followed precisely by the conveyance of complete information to the contractors, verifying that the construction site is fully safe for the workers.

A thoroughly carried out risk assessment process involves:

Looking for Potential Hazards:

After you have evaluated the work the finished tasks, identify potential dangers that may be associated with the presence of heavy vehicles at the site. Operations such as reversing, loading and unloading always have a higher probability of damage being done at the workplace.

Factors that increase the likelihood of occurrence of such accidents more include rough terrain, continuous exposure to bad weather conditions, labor working under multiple contractors, and time pressure. You can involve both the workers and their contractors in the risk assessment process, explaining to them what has been planned to reduce the level of risk.

Try preventing the following things in particular:

  • Running over pedestrians
  • Overturning vehicles
  • Vehicle accidents caused by falls while climbing or working too close to power lines
  • Vehicle malfunctioning

Identifying Who May Be Harmed

Figuring out every possible factor that can harm individuals on the work site is the first step towards implementation of safety measures. This will include everyone from contractors, workers, self-employed individuals and even the general public. Pay special attention to the areas where vehicle movement is mandatory and you can’t exclude the public.

It is also possible to take note of the likely hazards during the designing stage while the construction cost estimation is being done. Take note of the design for safety and also ensure to calculate cost of making safety provisions.

Prepare an Action Plan after Evaluating the Risks

Evaluating the risks associated with each hazard on the site will help you calculate the possibility of harm and the level of severity. Check whether you have taken enough protective measures to ensure the safety of people on-site. Thoroughly revise all important aspects such as workplace design and signs and signals.  Ensure that all workers have the proper personal protective gear that is needed to complete the job safely.

Taking Action

Once the risk assessment process is completed, list all preventive measures based on priority. When it is time to take action, take all the workers and contractors along. Though your focus should be on implementing measures to prevent any accident from taking place in the first place, it will be equally important to have be prepared for the worst and have all emergency provisions in place too.

Author Bio: Laura Laurel is a Stanford graduate in civil engineer with specialization in Civil Designs, Cost Estimation and 3D Modeling. She began her career as a construction trainee at Viatechnik LLC, rose to be involved with road and bridge construction. She loves to write about Real Estate and Construction Related Subjects.

MAY IS NATIONAL ELECTRICAL SAFETY MONTH

Every year in the United States, workplace electrical incidents result in more than 300 deaths and 3,500 injuries.  While electrical hazards are not the leading cause of on-the-job injuries and fatalities, they are disproportionately fatal and costly.  For every 13 electrical injuries, a worker dies.   Knowing best practices of electrical safety are critical to reducing these staggering statistics because most of these injuries could be prevented. 

Electricity and electrical products play a fundamental role in how we conduct business every day. However, if not used or maintained appropriately, they can pose serious risks. Over the last ten years, more than 30,000 workers have been injured in workplace electrical accidents. These injuries not only disrupt the lives of the workers and their families, but also impact the productivity of employers. 

An arc flash is a sudden release of electrical energy through the air when a high-voltage gap exists and there is a breakdown between conductors. An arc flash gives off thermal radiation (heat) and bright, intense light that can cause burns and other injuries. Exposure to extreme temperatures burns the skin directly and ignites the clothing that the worker is wearing. 

An arc flash can be spontaneous, or can result from inadvertently bridging electrical contacts with a conducting object. Other causes may include dropped tools, the buildup of conductive dust, or corrosion. While great advances are being made to improve equipment design and thereby reduce the number of arc flash incidences, there is still much to be done. Each year, 2,000 workers are admitted to burn centers for treatment of severe arc flash burns. 

High-voltage arcs can also produce considerable pressure waves by rapidly heating the air and creating a blast. This pressure burst, or arc blast, can hit a worker with grenade-like force and send metal droplets from melted copper and aluminum electrical components shooting out at speeds up to 700 miles per hour – fast enough for the tiny shrapnel to penetrate ones body.  

Here are some important ways to prevent injuries and fatalities when working with electricity:

Every year, workers are injured or killed by circuits they thought were safely turned off. Simply shutting off the power is not enough. Hazardous conditions can still exist. You may not get a second chance to learn this important lesson, so always test before you touch! 

Most electrically-related fatalities and injuries could easily be avoided. Responsibility for your safety begins with you. Take steps to protect yourself everyday and make safety an integral part of how you do business. 

The number one way to prevent electrical injuries and fatalities is to turn off the equipment being worked on. It may take a little more time and planning, but your life and your health are worth it. Be proactive about de-energizing equipment and taking steps to ensure that your work environment remains safe. Working on energized equipment increases your risk of injury or death.

 

 Each day, nearly 3 million professionals participate in work activities where lockout/tagout procedures should be used. Unfortunately, too many workers still put themselves at risk by working energized or neglecting to follow their company’s lockout/tagout procedures. Year after year, failure to comply with the lockout/tagout standard is listed as one of the top OSHA violations. If the standards are followed, an estimated 120 fatalities and 50,000 injuries could be prevented annually. Get in the habit of doing this important step every time! 
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) will be the major factor in differentiating between an electrical event you walk away from and one that requires months of painful healing. PPE comes in many different forms, including: hard hats, gloves, goggles, safety shoes, flame-resistant clothing, dielectric safety glasses, face shields, fall protection equipment, etc.Be sure to choose the PPE that is right for you and your circumstances. PPE should be:

  • Worn CORRECTLY; zipped, buttoned, etc
  • Appropriate for the hazard
  • Worn as the outermost layer
  • Maintained properly and removed from service when needed

This month serves as a reminder that we must always be extremely careful when working around electricity. 

  Source: ESFi (Electrical Safety Foundation international)

SEARCHING FOR MUDSLIDE VICTIMS; LATER SEARCHING FOR ANSWERS

The Washington State area devastated by a mudslide Saturday, March 22nd, has seen much clear-cut logging.  Native American tribes and environmentalists have long warned that clear-cut logging could raise the risk of landslides.  Although the mountain ranges of the Pacific Northwest may appear solid and stolid, they are a geologically active part of the physical environment, including regular earthquakes, landslides, and the occasional volcano. Sometimes, human activities – including the clear-cut logging that patch-marks much of the region – have an important impact on forests, soils, and water patterns. 

The massive mudslide that hit  Saturday, March 22,  about 55 miles northeast of Seattle was part of that picture, all but wiping out the community of Oso across the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River.  As rescue and recovery efforts continued Friday morning, officials reported that the number of confirmed dead remains at 17 with another nine bodies located but not yet recovered. Ninety more individuals are still unaccounted for – large numbers in a small community of around 180 people.

The demand for lumber, plywood, paper, and other wood products is part of an industry that once dominated Washington State and Oregon.  Logging’s impact has been a concern for a number of years. Large, older trees take up more water than younger stands, which can take decades to mature and may be cut down before they reach full maturity. The Tulalip Tribes were so concerned with landslides hitting the Stillaguamish River and its prime salmon habitat that they blocked a proposed timber sale above an earlier slide in 1988.”There were some very large clear-cuts planned for that area, which made us very concerned,” Kurt Nelson, a hydrologist with the tribes, told KUOW, the NPR affiliate at the University of Washington in Seattle.  “That reach of the North Fork has multiple, ancient, deep-seated landslides,” Mr. Nelson said. “There’s a lot of unstable terrain in that area.”  Landslides have followed logging in that area at least four times, KUOW reported.

“This had been known at least since the ’50s as one of the more problematic areas on the Stillaguamish for perennial landslides,” Mr. Kennard,  (Geomorphologist Paul Kennard, who worked for the Tulalip Tribes in the 1980s and now works for the National Park Service at Mt. Rainier) reported.  Although state logging regulations have been tightened in recent years, The Seattle Times reports that a clear-cut nine years ago “appears to have strayed into a restricted area that could feed groundwater into the landslide zone that collapsed Saturday.” 

Heavy rains and winds are hampering rescue efforts, by both professional rescue teams and volunteers. The careful use of heavy equipment, helicopters, and other means of rescue continue.  Personnel are wading through debris, muck, trees, ice, and foul water.

 Meanwhile, the request by Washington Gov. Jay Inslee (D) for more federal assistance to help with recovery efforts in the Oso area has been approved. The money will be used to help local and state government agencies recover a portion of the estimated $4.5 million expected to be spent on emergency response, protective measures, and debris removal. Safety precautions should be used by all; pros and volunteers.  Wearing respiratory protection, gloves, goggles, hardhats, and protective clothing is important for the safety of those exposed to all types of hazards.

At his briefing Friday, Snohomish County Fire District Chief Travis Hots asked corporations and businesses in the region to donate money to help those affected. “Some of these people have lost their homes, some have lost their cars, some have lost their entire family,” he said. “Funerals will have to be paid for. Please dig deep.”  Chief Hots is the spokesman for search and recovery efforts.

 

Source: Christian Science Monitor, Associated Press