Category Archives: Head Protection

Construction Safety 101: Workwear, Safety Gear & Equipment

Construction Safety 101: Workwear, Safety Gear & Equipment

Keeping construction workers safe is a primary job among managers and foremen, with accomplishing the work to specifics and being on time being second. To support this main concern on construction sites, there are different pieces of safety vests and equipment that every worker should wear. These include items like safety vests, reflective T-shirts, and hard hats. Let’s walk through construction safety 101 while keeping your team sharp and safe on the construction site with these safety items.

Hard Hats

Protect the head in safety and style with an OSHA approved hard hat.  Hard hats should provide not just maximum protection from falling debris, but they should also deliver comfort factor for its wearer. For instance, if you need a high-performing hard hat with a Super-bowl style design, 2017 Super Bowl hard hats are approved for constructions site. These NFL hard hats are designed with comfortable and adjustable 4-point One-Touch Suspension for maximum protection and comfort.

Back Support Gears

Back injuries are among the most pressing health problems in construction sites by far. Hence, workers should promote maximum construction safety 101 by using back support gears to stay sharp and safe on the site.  The Allegro All Fit Back Support items are made in a universal size, so they fit most workers. Protect your back with these high-performance belts that deliver full back coverage, with neoprene pads for comfortable wear. For workers’ convenience, these back support gears come inside of a customized reusable zipper storage bag.

High Visibility Vests

Most construction workers require maximum flame resistance and maximum visibility at work. The Arc Flame Resistant Lime Class 2 Sleeveless Vest – Silver Stripe is preferred by many workers due to its wide range of applications. These High-Visibility vests come with silver stripes for excellent visibility as well as flame resistance. There are available in different sizes, so every worker will surely find the perfect size for him to work smartly and safely at the construction site.  They are also soft and flexible for maximum convenience.

Fall Protection

One of the most serious concerns among construction workers is falling. It is every employer’s responsibility to protect their employees from falls.  The Elk River Freedom Series Aerial Lift Kit is an OSHA-approved item that contains several fall protection products. If you work with platform lifts, buck trucks or scissor lifts, this item is a great product for you. They come with a unique D-ring harness for comfort and security while working high above the ground.

Safety Respirators

Protect your workers from gases, vapors and particles with high-performing reusable respirators. They

 

Provide protection against particles, gases and vapors with the 3M full line of reusable respirators. The 3M 5000 Half Face Respirator Kits are made to fit bigger head sizes. These safety respirators are very easy to set up and they can be used for wide range of applications.

Aside from these safety items, construction workers are also required to wear sturdy work shoes, long work pants, safety glasses, chemical splash goggles, face shields, hearing protection and protective gloves. At all times, practice construction safety 101 to keep your team safe and sharp at work.

 

Author Bio (Northbay)

Northbay is known for its high quality HVAC products and services that every client can depend on. They are proud to sell and install the finest air conditioning and heating products and carry out quality services for repair and maintenance. They can help you with all your HVAC needs, regardless of your system’s makes and models. They pride themselves for their unmatched customer service. http://www.northbayheatingandair.com/

 

 

6 Must-Have HVAC Health & Safety Products

6 Must-Have HVAC Health & Safety Products

HVAC Health & Safety Products are optimally matched so you can benefit not only from efficient installation and reduce operational costs, but also form an additional layer of security against system failure. Today let’s walk through a rundown of top HVAC products that are perfect for your air heating and cooling needs.

  1. HVAC Safety Glasses

Protect yourself by picking HVAC safety glasses that comply with the latest industry standard. For instance, Jackson Nemesis CAMO Safety Glasses w/ Amber Lens is a useful HVAC safety product for a vast range of applications. They come with a unique camouflage design and several types of lens tints to make HVAC works easier and safer.

  1. Multi-Task Light Gloves

Eliminate the fatigue and the risks of hand injury while working on HVAC systems. Invest in a high quality safety glove that that provides high levelsb of illumination for any task. You’d surely love the efficiency of MCR RED Multi Task Light Gloves made with sophisticated finger construction that delivers high-intensity LED lights. They are designed from synthetic leather and can be utilized for different kinds of tasks.

  1. Safety Vests

All HVAC workers should use a high-visibility safety vest. When looking for a safety vest, you should always look into the background colors of your working area, so you won’t blend into it. For example, if you’re working on a blacktop with white safety cones, you might want to choose a high-visibility safety vest like Orange Surveyors Vests with THINK SAFETY Imprint on Back.

  1. Hard Hats

One of the most important HVAC Health & Safety Products is hard hats. They protect the head from potential injuries due to falling objects, electric shock or impact with debris. Experts recommend HVAC safety hard hats that are designed from a protective polyethylene shell such as MSA V-Gard Cap Style Hard Hats with One Touch Suspensions. They are designed for superior impact and puncture resistance.

  1. Safety Coverall

Safety coveralls for HVAC works should be comfortable, functional and provide the necessary safety level of contractors. It’s a smart ideal to invest in high quality HVAC clothing such as Indura Flame Resistant Coverall. It weighs only 9 ounces and is designed with a unique Khaki color style. Theses safety clothings provide optimum flame resistance. Thanks to its flame-retardant polymer.

  1. Hearing Protection Products

HVAC Health & Safety Products for hearing protection including earplugs are designed for workers who work in noisy settings. These safety products are important not only to protect your hearing from loud noise but also for your safety. Purchase a high-performing hearing protection product like Howard Leight USA Earplugs Uncorded. These earplugs have patriotic colors that also help increase visibility. They easily adapt to your ear canal’s shape and they are very comfortable to wear.

In a working environment where health and safety are very crucial, it is important to choose the right tools and apparels. To those who work in the HVAC industry, the above-mentioned HVAC Health & Safety Products are all you need to keep HVAC jobs much easier, more convenient, and safer.

 

Author Bio (Withrow Mechanical Inc)

Withrow Mechanical Inc is a highly dependable HVAC company that specializes in residential and commercial heating and cooling solutions. The company aims to provide customers with top quality products and services that are unique to every situation. While doing this, they strive to keep all HVAC projects on time and within the budget of their customers. Committed to customers’ complete satisfaction, Withrow Mechanical Inc. stands behind all of their workmanship for the best HVAC solutions. http://withrowmechanical.com

 

 

 

 

All visitors to a site may require protection, not just the workers.

It goes without saying that construction companies need to look for enough safety gear to cover their workforce. While crews should be provided the proper work vests, boots and helmets, there are other concerns that businesses may overlook. In a recent article for Construction Citizen, Jim Kollaer of Kollaer Advisors describes a possible problem he witnessed in a construction team in Houston, Texas.

Kollaer said that he saw a team heading to a hot mix job. Though the workers were all wearing the right protective gear, the driver—possibly an owner of the company—didn’t have a helmet on and seemed unprepared. When Kollaer told the crew about this, his concerns were dismissed. All the same, it shows the possible safety gaps that can arise on a work site, even if companies are trying to keep everyone wearing the right equipment.

Following OSHA guidelines can help companies keep everyone protected at the same degree. A fact sheet from the organization notes that employers should go beyond simply acquiring the right equipment, and also train workers to wear and maintain this gear correctly.

According to this source, hard hats are useful for protecting against penetration and electrical injuries as well as dangers from falling objects. It’s also the employer’s responsibility to communicate with workers and let them know which equipment is necessary.

This includes not just headwear but other forms of protection, such as hand, foot and face guards. By creating a strong safety culture, companies could also train their workers to respond when they see bad behavior.

Purchasing team hard hats all at once is the first step to a safer workplace, but it’s also a point where some companies make mistakes. Cover everyone who will be on site with the equipment available from Texas America Safety Company

CATEGORIES

Will hard hats with new technology appear in the near future?

As more and more devices become “wired,” it seems that every profession is set to accommodate more data access. Google Glass was one example of a data interface with possible worksite applications, and Sourceable recently commented on another way that this could come to the construction industry: “smart” hard hats. This would involve putting sensors inside a worker’s helmet to address potential safety concerns.

One way this could work is by transmitting health information live from a worker to others, encouraging proper treatment and response when something bad threatens a worker. Eventually, this information could help predictive analytics foresee possible trends and work around them as well.

Dr. Rod Shepard of Laing O’Rourke said that his company’s plan for a more predictive approach to injury prevention “looks more at big data collecting information over a period of time” before working that into future plans. “It may be that we have a couple of alert scenarios over several months, but really the huge advantage can be gained long term in guiding how we do things day to day,” he added.

In an article for City A.M., Alastair Sorbie of IFS examined the ways that “disruptive technology” have already entered into construction. These include digital modeling tools that can help construction efforts avoid problems and ensure a safer work site.

Sorbie does note that implementing more technology in this sector will require workers with the skills to use it, which will be especially important in attracting future employees. In this way, the issue of using tech to encourage safety touches on other important trends impacting construction, at least in the U.K.

For more about hardhats and other necessary construction safety gear, contact Texas America Safety Company. We have supplies for many different work situations and weather conditions.

CATEGORIES

Head Protective Gear

Preventing Traumatic Head Injuries at Work

If you work in the construction or transportation industry, in agriculture or forestry or any business that requires the use of machinery and working from a height, preventing head injuries in your employees will be one of your top priorities.

Traumatic brain injuries (TBI’s) can occur when there is an impact to the head, a jolt – such as a whiplash injury – or by penetrative damage by an object such as falling masonry. The outcome for TBI victims varies. Some injuries are mild and the body can self-heal with the right care. A mild concussion causes confusion and nausea and vomiting. A more severe injury may cause symptoms like memory loss, changes in personality, mood swings or the development of long-term health disorders like epilepsy in previously healthy people. At the most severe end of the spectrum, TBI’s can result in unconsciousness, mental retardation or death.

Every year in the USA, there are 275,000 hospitalizations for TBI’s of all causes and of these, 52,000 people lose their lives.

Work Related Traumatic Brain Injury

Researchers for The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in the Division of Safety Research in Morgantown, West Virginia, studied the trends of fatal occupational TBI’s in the U.S between 2003-2008 and determined that the fatality rate for workers from TBI was 0.8 per 100,000 workers each year. 15 times more men were affected than women, possibly due to the fact that men are more commonly occupied in industries where there is the most risk of a TBI. The construction industry, agriculture, forestry and fishing businesses accounted for nearly half of all TBI fatalities. The leading cause of death has now shifted from motor vehicle accidents to falls and one of the reasons for this may be the rise in employment of people over the age of 65.

Older workers are more susceptible to falling due to the effects of aging so special attention needs to be given to ensure the safety of older workers.

How to Protect Your Workers

Ensure that all your workers attend regular health and safety briefings and that they remember safety procedures set out by your business and any regulatory authorities.

For those in construction and other high risk industries, ensure that your workers wear protective headgear when working at height or when at risk of falling objects.

Make sure you check all protective helmets for signs of damage. A damaged helmet may not protect your worker in the event of a fall.
Make sure your workers wear protective headgear that fits them correctly. Poorly fitting helmets may not protect in the event of an accident, just like incorrectly fitted baby car seats won’t. The helmet has to be secure.

Cheap headgear can be inferior. Make sure you purchase quality headgear that has been subject to safety and durability testing so that you can have peace of mind that you are doing everything you can to ensure the safety of your workers. You can make sure your headgear complies with ANSI/ASSE Z89.1-2009 or The American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection. Complying with these standards will establish the requirements for penetration protection and impact protection as well as electrical insulation protection.

If your workers are at risk of flying debris, chemicals or inhalants, make sure they all wear high quality eye protection glasses or visors, as required by law in OSHA’s 29 CFR 1910 Subpart I, Personal Protective Equipment legislation.
If your worker wears glasses make sure any eye protection you buy for him or her has the prescription lenses included so that they don’t have to wear their regular glasses while on the job. Glasses can present a risk of penetrative injury in an accident but a worker who cannot see properly presents an even greater risk.

Frequently check in with your older workers to ensure that they can still do the tasks you employed them to do at the start of their contract, especially if they have been having problems with illness. Offer workplace medical benefits such as an annual physical examination.
Organize shifts in a way that may minimize the risk of falls for older workers. Allow more frequent breaks for the worker over 65.
Make sure you service and update your machinery and make sure it is the latest kind. Newer machinery has been safety tested to the latest standards and will have the latest safety features to help prevent accidents.

Cleaning is Essential Part of Work Safety

Even the safest-looking workplaces have their own dangerous moments. If you think that nothing wrong could possibly come to you in the safety of your own calm office, think again. There are probably bookshelves near you, with books high above you that could fall off and concuss you. How are the power outlets handled? Are there any bare wires? If you are working in a paper-filled office, even the smallest sparks can lead to big fires if not handled immediately. And, believe it or not, all these dangers are doubled when you opt to do some cleaning around the office. Here are some tips on how to protect yourself and the office.

• If you are about to do some office cleaning, use gloves. Hand protection is important even in the smallest of instances. Rubber gloves can save you a nasty shock and spill if you accidentally come in contact with a bare wire. They will also protect your hands from all the toxins in the cleaning product you are using. Avoid gross rashes and itchy spots with ease, simply put on a pair of gloves while rubbing your desk with a cleaner product and all will be fine.

Cleaning is Essential Part of Work Safety

• If might seem laughable, but if you are working in a place with lots of shelves with files or books, and you are trying to dust them, or even just looking for a particular item, you should use some headgear. Imagine you inadvertently shake a bookcase as you are browsing through some volumes, and there are heavy and unchecked books or folders above you. One wrong step (or shake) will collapse a few of those volumes over your head and could easily lead to a bad concussion.

• Be wary of slippery spots on your floor or carpet. If you are one to have lunches in the office, surely you spilled something once or twice, but did not bother to thoroughly clean it. Some stains become slippery over time and you should protect yourself – and the ones coming into your office from them. Get some carpet cleaners to remove it, or even hire a cleaning agency to do regular office cleaning and keep your workplace safe. Yes, cleanliness sometimes is the key to safety. A professional cleaner will do a fine job of recognizing lasting and problematic stains and will remove them to bring the shine to your office.

• If you are working with a lot of office hardware, you should know that it is inevitable that something may eventually breakdown. Unless you are a mechanic or specialize in office appliance repairs, call an actual repairman to see to the problem. Do not be a hero and try to help out a colleague with a quick fix to a problem that you have no clue about. Leave the broken machinery as they are and call somebody who actually can fix them.

Cleaning is Essential Part of Work Safety2

It requires very little to work safely in your office. A small bit of effort put into a clean and organized office will do wonders for the state of your workplace. If you cannot do it yourself, get a cleaning company. The key thing here is to work safe, so expenses should not be an obstacle.
Read more basic cleaning tips on: finchleycarpetcleaners.org.uk

Taking Preemptive Measures for Vehicle Accidents in Construction (Guest Post)

Since reducing the risk of fatal accidents and death rate within the construction industry is not an easy job, taking timely, effective preemptive measures is the only way out. Read further for a fair idea of what can be done and how!

The rate of accidents, injuries and deaths associated with the construction industry is much higher than most other areas of work. The most common reasons that make construction work perilous is possibility of deadly accidents with vehicles and falls from extreme height.

On an average, every third fatal accident at a construction site has one or more vehicles involved. Frequently occurring transport accidents at work include:

  1. Victims being stuck by moving vehicles, especially while reversing
  2. People falling from vehicles or hit by things falling from vehicles
  3. Overturning vehicles leading to serious injuries

What Can Be Done to Prevent Vehicle Accidents in Construction?

The first step towards reducing high death rate in construction industry is to reduce the risk of fatal accidents at construction sites that involve vehicles. Employers need to fulfill their legal duties and play a pivotal role in that case, especially by assessing risks and taking practical measures to ensure the safety of everyone around.

This may include maintaining accident records, training and consulting employees, and co-coordinating and cooperating contractors. The focus needs to be on planning and implementing collective safety measures, instead of giving individual measures extra importance. The basic idea should be to replace the hazardous with the harmless.

Taking Preemptive Measures for Vehicle Accidents in the Construction Industry

Practically, accident prevention should not start after the work has already begun on the construction site. Instead, designers, architects and planners can considerably diminish the risk of vehicle accidents by designing and planning well in the pre-build phase.

Risk assessment is the most important aspect that every employer ought to take care of, followed precisely by the conveyance of complete information to the contractors, verifying that the construction site is fully safe for the workers.

A thoroughly carried out risk assessment process involves:

Looking for Potential Hazards:

After you have evaluated the work the finished tasks, identify potential dangers that may be associated with the presence of heavy vehicles at the site. Operations such as reversing, loading and unloading always have a higher probability of damage being done at the workplace.

Factors that increase the likelihood of occurrence of such accidents more include rough terrain, continuous exposure to bad weather conditions, labor working under multiple contractors, and time pressure. You can involve both the workers and their contractors in the risk assessment process, explaining to them what has been planned to reduce the level of risk.

Try preventing the following things in particular:

  • Running over pedestrians
  • Overturning vehicles
  • Vehicle accidents caused by falls while climbing or working too close to power lines
  • Vehicle malfunctioning

Identifying Who May Be Harmed

Figuring out every possible factor that can harm individuals on the work site is the first step towards implementation of safety measures. This will include everyone from contractors, workers, self-employed individuals and even the general public. Pay special attention to the areas where vehicle movement is mandatory and you can’t exclude the public.

It is also possible to take note of the likely hazards during the designing stage while the construction cost estimation is being done. Take note of the design for safety and also ensure to calculate cost of making safety provisions.

Prepare an Action Plan after Evaluating the Risks

Evaluating the risks associated with each hazard on the site will help you calculate the possibility of harm and the level of severity. Check whether you have taken enough protective measures to ensure the safety of people on-site. Thoroughly revise all important aspects such as workplace design and signs and signals.  Ensure that all workers have the proper personal protective gear that is needed to complete the job safely.

Taking Action

Once the risk assessment process is completed, list all preventive measures based on priority. When it is time to take action, take all the workers and contractors along. Though your focus should be on implementing measures to prevent any accident from taking place in the first place, it will be equally important to have be prepared for the worst and have all emergency provisions in place too.

Author Bio: Laura Laurel is a Stanford graduate in civil engineer with specialization in Civil Designs, Cost Estimation and 3D Modeling. She began her career as a construction trainee at Viatechnik LLC, rose to be involved with road and bridge construction. She loves to write about Real Estate and Construction Related Subjects.

SAFETY TIPS FOR A DIY HANDYMAN (GUEST POST)

 

Almost all handyman jobs involve risks and this is why it is important to ensure safety on the service site. Read on for some useful safety tips that’ll help you prevent injuries while working.

Since most handyman services involve lots of hazards, working without the right safety equipment and moving around carelessly can lead to serious injuries. When grinding or welding without goggles, for instance, you’ll obviously end up getting metal particles in your eyes. So, why close the eyes to handy, hi-tech safety measures and equipment when they are easily available and invite plenty of risks!

Here are practical safety tips that are basically lessons learned by our handymen from their mistakes in the past:

1.Pressure Washers Can Peel Your Skin

Pressure washers are the most common handyman tools used to clean up areas like the patio and roof of a building. Since handymen get their attention diverted by a variety of stimuli in the open, they often make the mistake of holding the pressure washer and operating the trigger with only one hand. This can cause the spray wand to move across your hand, peeling the skin off.

It is important that as a professional, you understand and respect the power of water, especially when it is pressurized for cleaning the concrete etc. 

2. Bump-Nailing Can Nail Your Feet

The use of a framing nailer for fastening plywood to joints is a common practice for handymen. But when the nailer is set in bump mode, you need to be fully attentive, for forgetting to pushing the nose of the gun properly against the wood can lead to serious injuries. The worst, you may bump the nose of the gun at the wrong spot such as one of your own feet! Make sure you’ve properly bumped the gun-point on the target area before you pull the trigger. 

3. Safety against Electric Shocks is Important

One of the most important safety steps at a repair site is to check electricity wires using a non-contact tester before laying a hand on them. Commonly, handymen take off the fuse in a hurry and start disconnecting the wires from outlets. There maybe two circuits linked to the outlet, of which you have turned off only one. So, when you touch the wires barehanded, you’ll get knocked back by a powerful shove of electricity shooting up your entire body!

When performing such a job, don’t forget to test and double-check the wires with a tester. 

4. Sheet Metal Can Slice Your Body Parts 

Drilling holes in pieces of metals is another common handyman duty involving a great deal of risk. Handymen are often in a rush and don’t take time to compress the metal to a table etc. This can cause the drill to be caught by the sheet and thrown onto you, creating a deep rip on one of your body parts.

Before you start to drill a hole on a metal sheet, clamp it to a table and adjust your hand and the drill well.

 

Author Bio:

Dan Kogan is the owner of Handyman at your service which is a US based company providing Handyman Services to business owners at an affordable price. Handyman at your service specializing in TV installation NYC, Electrical work, Plumbing NYC, IKEA Assembly NYC and many more.

 

MAY IS NATIONAL ELECTRICAL SAFETY MONTH

Every year in the United States, workplace electrical incidents result in more than 300 deaths and 3,500 injuries.  While electrical hazards are not the leading cause of on-the-job injuries and fatalities, they are disproportionately fatal and costly.  For every 13 electrical injuries, a worker dies.   Knowing best practices of electrical safety are critical to reducing these staggering statistics because most of these injuries could be prevented. 

Electricity and electrical products play a fundamental role in how we conduct business every day. However, if not used or maintained appropriately, they can pose serious risks. Over the last ten years, more than 30,000 workers have been injured in workplace electrical accidents. These injuries not only disrupt the lives of the workers and their families, but also impact the productivity of employers. 

An arc flash is a sudden release of electrical energy through the air when a high-voltage gap exists and there is a breakdown between conductors. An arc flash gives off thermal radiation (heat) and bright, intense light that can cause burns and other injuries. Exposure to extreme temperatures burns the skin directly and ignites the clothing that the worker is wearing. 

An arc flash can be spontaneous, or can result from inadvertently bridging electrical contacts with a conducting object. Other causes may include dropped tools, the buildup of conductive dust, or corrosion. While great advances are being made to improve equipment design and thereby reduce the number of arc flash incidences, there is still much to be done. Each year, 2,000 workers are admitted to burn centers for treatment of severe arc flash burns. 

High-voltage arcs can also produce considerable pressure waves by rapidly heating the air and creating a blast. This pressure burst, or arc blast, can hit a worker with grenade-like force and send metal droplets from melted copper and aluminum electrical components shooting out at speeds up to 700 miles per hour – fast enough for the tiny shrapnel to penetrate ones body.  

Here are some important ways to prevent injuries and fatalities when working with electricity:

Every year, workers are injured or killed by circuits they thought were safely turned off. Simply shutting off the power is not enough. Hazardous conditions can still exist. You may not get a second chance to learn this important lesson, so always test before you touch! 

Most electrically-related fatalities and injuries could easily be avoided. Responsibility for your safety begins with you. Take steps to protect yourself everyday and make safety an integral part of how you do business. 

The number one way to prevent electrical injuries and fatalities is to turn off the equipment being worked on. It may take a little more time and planning, but your life and your health are worth it. Be proactive about de-energizing equipment and taking steps to ensure that your work environment remains safe. Working on energized equipment increases your risk of injury or death.

 

 Each day, nearly 3 million professionals participate in work activities where lockout/tagout procedures should be used. Unfortunately, too many workers still put themselves at risk by working energized or neglecting to follow their company’s lockout/tagout procedures. Year after year, failure to comply with the lockout/tagout standard is listed as one of the top OSHA violations. If the standards are followed, an estimated 120 fatalities and 50,000 injuries could be prevented annually. Get in the habit of doing this important step every time! 
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) will be the major factor in differentiating between an electrical event you walk away from and one that requires months of painful healing. PPE comes in many different forms, including: hard hats, gloves, goggles, safety shoes, flame-resistant clothing, dielectric safety glasses, face shields, fall protection equipment, etc.Be sure to choose the PPE that is right for you and your circumstances. PPE should be:

  • Worn CORRECTLY; zipped, buttoned, etc
  • Appropriate for the hazard
  • Worn as the outermost layer
  • Maintained properly and removed from service when needed

This month serves as a reminder that we must always be extremely careful when working around electricity. 

  Source: ESFi (Electrical Safety Foundation international)

SKIP AND CONTAINER SAFETY WHEN MANAGING WASTE (GUEST POST)

Waste management is an essential part of completing a job for a professional tradesperson or DIY enthusiast. The safe use of skips and containers can be a tricky path to tread for those unfamiliar with health and safety regulations and guidelines. Unbeknown to many, skip and container related accidents are a common occurrence, in fact, these are the leading cause of serious to fatal incidents in waste management and recycling plants.  Here we take a closer look at utilizing skips and containers safely to help you reduce the risk of serious injury.

Skip (dumpster) compatibility

Whether you are looking to buy or hire a skip for your upcoming project, ensuring that your skip is compatible with the skip loader is a vital step to safe usage. Mini skips, with a capacity of 1.5m3 to 2m3, are the most popular choice, especially for household or small commercial / industrial upgrades. However, many of these mini skips are not manufactured to suit the design of a standard skip loader. Larger skips however are designed to be compatible with standard skip loaders, and their 3m3 to 20m3 capacity ensures a sizable solution to waste management on larger projects. Recommended safety checks There are a series of safety checks that must be carried out to ensure the safe use of skips and containers.

Training is recommended for workers who use and unload skips and containers on a regular basis, these training programs ensure workers can identify faults or damage to the skip that would otherwise make it unsafe to use. Regular checks must also be carried out to check the condition of important skip and container components, such as the lifting and locking points, tipping bars, doors, restraints, covers and wider condition. Workers must also be aware of the importance of using the right type of skip for the task at hand, and the skip or container’s strength, stability and distribution of load weight must all be taken into account.

Identifying hazardous skip use

There are a number of scenarios that would make the skip or container hazardous to move or unload, including:

  • Overloading
  • Insufficient headroom when retrieving
  • Insufficient space around the skip or container
  • Placement on sloping ground
  • Placement on soft ground

If any of these relate to your skip or container then it is recommended that you seek specialist advice to improve safety and reduce risk before removal or unloading. Overly damaged skips and containers should also be removed from service completely.

This post was written by Brittany Thorley. She works for Cheshire Demolition (http://www.cheshiredemolition.co.uk/) and regularly advises on maintaining best practice for safety on both small and large scale improvement projects.

Note: Of course, workers in this field should take all precautions and wear the correct personal protective gear, such as gloves, safety glasses, hardhats, and possibly respirators  pb

 

P.S. HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY!  PB