Tag Archives: convenience


 Learning should never be confined in the four corners of the classroom. As long as people live, they will seek intelligence. As Aristotle said, “all men by nature desire knowledge.” After graduating, people depend on their work to satisfy their desire for knowledge. How they perform in their companies, have an effect on how much they boost their cognitive ability.

But how can their jobs be conducive to learning if their workroom does not promote better work performance? Ergonomics has a lot to say on this. Various studies show that cognitive performance is linked to environmental design and human factors.

Few renovations and improvements can help employees do better in their jobs and satisfy their desire for knowledge. To help you, here are a few ergonomic tips that ignite learning in a working environment:

Workroom Layout

During a busy day at the office, do you find yourself going from the printer, copy machine and back to your station and feel easily worn-out? You’ll never perform well if your workroom is not fit to human factors. Every important tools should be convenient to reach. Otherwise, it can limit people’s action and interrupt work flow. Tables and chairs should also fit the height of the user to avoid posture problems. Adequate space under the workstation is important to leave room for the feet to relax.

Room Design

Why do you think Google, one of the best companies to work for is very appealing among job seekers? It’s because everyone loves to work in a working environment that promotes fun, creativity and learning. Just imagine working in office like of Google. For sure, you will feel inspired to go to work every day.

But not all are as rich as Google. To get the same effect, apply visual ergonomics in your workroom. A well designed room helps promote learning and better performance. According to the color of psychology, green represents energy, power and rejuvenation. It is known to help people avoid eye-strain because of its soothing effect. Paint this color on your walls, or add green accents, like fresh plants to get your employees inspired to work.


Productivity is related to light condition. Wrong light system can cause eye-strain and eventually, physical exhaustion. Monitor glare is the major roots of eye fatigue so light source should be ceiling suspended and does not directly hit the work station. To control light from an outside source, use a window blind or shade. No matter how visually pleasing the lights in your office are, if it is too dark or light that you squint to properly see what you are working at, it won’t do much in boosting productivity.

Eye-to-screen Distance

Your computer monitor emits light. This also causes eye-strain. Ergonomics tells you to keep a safe distance from your monitor when working in front of the computer for long hours. How far is far? Well it is hard to tell, but experts suggest that users have to avoid getting closer than the resting point of vergence (RPV). This is the point when the eyesight projected in both retinas are almost the same. It is the safe zone to avoid double images and eye fatigue. Farther is better! but make sure that you are comfortable reading the texts. In the end, it is in your judgment to tell, which distance fits your work condition. You have to consider the screen and font size.

Task Design

Cognitive growth in workplace is associated to the amount of task that people do, and amount of resting period they get. That is why tasks should be properly designed to fit the human condition. If there are too much workload, employees should get ample break to regain energy. Managers are responsible in keeping the productivity of their workers by knowing their capabilities and limitations. Enough social interaction is also healthy, to perform better at work.

Why do you think employees often use “lack of growth” in their resignation letters? That is because they don’t feel growing in terms of experience, performance and knowledge. Work performance is linked to employee’s cognitive development. To make employees learn new things, you have to promote productivity in a workroom.

Although ergonomics is not the sole reason for human intellectual growth, the tips above can help promote learning in a working environment. 

Author’s Bio

Ethan Harvell is a blogger and writer for a corporate magazine. He has also contributed articles for different newsletters in various websites. He gets most of his writing experience from bestessays, a writing company, where he is currently employed.


The moment you’ve been dreading for nearly 16 years is finally here. It’s time for your teenager to learn how to drive. Whether it’s your first go-round or your last kiddo, you have to decide if you’re going to teach your teen to drive or let a professional driving instructor do it. If you’re still on the fence about what’s best for your teen, take a look at these seven benefits of teaching your teen to drive to help make your decision a little clearer. 

Teens may benefit most from hearing your personal driving experiences rather than from an instructor they don’t know. Talk to your teenager about your ups and down of driving and tell stories of any tickets or car crashes you were involved with and what you learned from those experiences. You can turn any personal driving story into a valuable learning lesson for your kid.

Drive whenever, wherever you want:
Homeschooled teens have more opportunities to practice driving whenever, wherever. Every outing to the grocery store, soccer practice, or trip to the city can be a valuable learning experience for your teen. This will help them become more comfortable behind the wheel and give them the opportunity to act out real-life scenarios.

After spending 50 hours or more supervising your teen behind the wheel, you’re sure to feel a lot more confident about their driving skills. Hopefully, they will have earned your trust by the end of the course and feel better about tackling the wide open road without you.

4.     Go more in-depth with the lessons:

As a driving instructor, you have the ability to go more in-depth with your lessons and talk about driving more often than driving school instructors. Unlike most driver’s education courses, you will have time to thoroughly discuss the before and after of every lesson and talk about other driving topics, such as maintenance, repairs, and the anatomy of a car. You can also teach your teen how to change a tire, jumpstart a battery, test the oil and coolant levels, and much more.

A huge benefit of teaching your teen to drive yourself is that you get lots of valuable one-on-one time. You don’t have to worry about other teens being in the car or instructors rushing through lessons. It’s just you and your child. During this time, you can discuss the seriousness of driving and talk about your driving expectations.

6.     < One of the biggest benefits of teaching your teen to drive is the convenience of being able to do it on your own time. You can organize the driving lessons to fit around your schedule and use nights or weekends to fit in lessons when it’s convenient for you and your child. You don’t have to mess with dropping off and picking up your teen after their driving education class.

7.     Teaching your teen to drive is cheaper than enrolling in a driver education school. Depending on where you live, a parent- teaching program will likely cost no more than $20 or $30. The money you save from not enrolling in a driver education school can be put toward your teen’s insurance or first car.

Our thanks to Arianna Bush for sending this interesting article. It really makes sense in many ways: you are able to judge your teen’s capabilities of handling a car, and see how serious they are about driving safely.  The most important thing either parents or drivers’ education programs can stress is not using cell phones while driving.  pb